Date of Award

2016

Document Type

Campus Access Only

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Leadership Studies

Department

Leadership Studies

Committee Chair

Polloway, Edward.

Committee Member

Selden, Sally C.

Committee Member

Buck, Glenn H.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the likelihood of a minority student, specifically an African American student, being correctly recognized as having dual exceptionalities by teachers and being referred for appropriate identification. Elementary and middle school teachers in a South Central Virginia school district were asked to complete a survey online. The teachers were randomly assigned to one of six variations of a vignette that described a fictional student at their school. The text of the vignettes was identical except for the labels describing the student’s race and their previous disability diagnosis. The primary focus of the study was not found to be statistically significant. However, although not statistically significant, the means for the vignette label compared with the recommendation for gifted programming ranged from .57, for an African American student with a previous learning disability diagnosis, to .82, for a White student. In this study, an African American student with a previous learning disability diagnosis will be accurately referred by teachers for identification for gifted programming 57% of the time. A White student with no previous disability diagnosis will be referred by teachers for identification for gifted programming 82% of the time.

Rights

Release the entire work for Lynchburg College electronic access only for 3 years, after this time release the work for electronic access worldwide.

Available for download on Tuesday, May 07, 2019

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