Poster or Presentation Title

Wolbachia

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Biology

Abstract

Luke Turner

Abstratct

Wolbachia is a common group of bacteria found to infect about forty percent of all arthropods, making them one of the most prolific types of bacteria in the world. Wolbachia infects the reproductive tissues of host arthropods, forming both symbiotic and parasitic relationships with the host. Wolbachia has various evolutionary effects on a population, the most well-known being feminization.Recent studies have suggested that Wolbachia may drive evolution by directly manipulating the genome of the host. Wolbachia infects many species with endangered populations, one of which is Cicindelidae more commonly known as the Tiger Beetle. Despite the prevalence of studies of Wolbachia and the known infection of Tiger Beetles there is little work concerning a possible evolutionary mechanism that explains the wide array diversity displayed in tiger beetles. In this experiment, we will quantify infection rates in Tiger Beetle populations, and use this information to examine trends in evolution.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Frieman

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 12:00 PM Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Wolbachia

Luke Turner

Abstratct

Wolbachia is a common group of bacteria found to infect about forty percent of all arthropods, making them one of the most prolific types of bacteria in the world. Wolbachia infects the reproductive tissues of host arthropods, forming both symbiotic and parasitic relationships with the host. Wolbachia has various evolutionary effects on a population, the most well-known being feminization.Recent studies have suggested that Wolbachia may drive evolution by directly manipulating the genome of the host. Wolbachia infects many species with endangered populations, one of which is Cicindelidae more commonly known as the Tiger Beetle. Despite the prevalence of studies of Wolbachia and the known infection of Tiger Beetles there is little work concerning a possible evolutionary mechanism that explains the wide array diversity displayed in tiger beetles. In this experiment, we will quantify infection rates in Tiger Beetle populations, and use this information to examine trends in evolution.