Poster or Presentation Title

Intercollegiate Soccer Athlete Head Impacts Across Field Locations

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Biological Science

Abstract

Context: Head impacts have come under increased scrutiny in recent years as the effects of subconcussive impacts remain not fully understood, especially in soccer athletes. The effect of field location on frequency and magnitude of head impacts in soccer has not been studied. Objective: To determine the magnitude and frequency of head impacts across field location in intercollegiate soccer athletes. Setting: Soccer fields. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included 9 male (age=18.67±1.00 years, height: 184.57±5.39 cm; mass: 80.32±13.50 kg) and 17 female (age: 19.42±1.42 years, height: 166.16±5.23 cm; mass: 64.14±7.22 kg) intercollegiate soccer athletes. Interventions: Magnitude and frequency of head impacts were recorded via X2 Biosystems xPatch sensors. Main Outcome Measures: The xPatch sensors measured linear (g) and rotational (deg/sec2) acceleration during head impacts. Results: The magnitude did not depend on field location (Linear: �29=10.29, P=.33; Rotational: �29=14.17, P=.12). The results of the study indicated that a majority of the verified impacts occurred in the defensive middle zone (IR=63.03, CI=47.94-78.12). Conclusions: Clearances and goal kicks can often land in the defensive middle zone, which may be a reason why this zone observed the most head impacts. Increased player peripheral awareness would increase preparation for impacts from other players, while coaching correct heading technique would lower the risk of head injuries resulting from heading the ball.

Faculty Mentor

Tom Bowman, Debbie Bradney

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Intercollegiate Soccer Athlete Head Impacts Across Field Locations

Context: Head impacts have come under increased scrutiny in recent years as the effects of subconcussive impacts remain not fully understood, especially in soccer athletes. The effect of field location on frequency and magnitude of head impacts in soccer has not been studied. Objective: To determine the magnitude and frequency of head impacts across field location in intercollegiate soccer athletes. Setting: Soccer fields. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included 9 male (age=18.67±1.00 years, height: 184.57±5.39 cm; mass: 80.32±13.50 kg) and 17 female (age: 19.42±1.42 years, height: 166.16±5.23 cm; mass: 64.14±7.22 kg) intercollegiate soccer athletes. Interventions: Magnitude and frequency of head impacts were recorded via X2 Biosystems xPatch sensors. Main Outcome Measures: The xPatch sensors measured linear (g) and rotational (deg/sec2) acceleration during head impacts. Results: The magnitude did not depend on field location (Linear: �29=10.29, P=.33; Rotational: �29=14.17, P=.12). The results of the study indicated that a majority of the verified impacts occurred in the defensive middle zone (IR=63.03, CI=47.94-78.12). Conclusions: Clearances and goal kicks can often land in the defensive middle zone, which may be a reason why this zone observed the most head impacts. Increased player peripheral awareness would increase preparation for impacts from other players, while coaching correct heading technique would lower the risk of head injuries resulting from heading the ball.