Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Biomedical Science

Abstract

Context: Subconcussive head impacts receive increased attention for brain health. It remains unknown if game type affects frequency or magnitude of head impacts. Objective: Examine relationship between magnitude and frequency of head impacts during regular and postseason soccer games. Setting: Collegiate soccer fields. Participants: 17 women’s soccer athletes (height=163.68±4.99 cm, age=19.88±1.05 years, mass=61.12±5.00 kg) participated in 19 regular and 9 postseason games during 2014 season. Main Outcome Measures: Game type. XPatch sensor (Seattle, WA) collected linear (g) and rotational (deg/sec2) accelerations, Incidence rates (IR) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) determining frequency differences. Mann-Whitney U tests determined magnitude differences because normality assumptions were violated. Results: Regular season participants received almost 1 head impact per exposure (IR=945.95, CI= 835.15-1056.75). Postseason participants received head impacts in approximately 1 out of every 5 exposures (IR=195.49, CI=120.35-270.63). Participants were almost 5 times more likely (IRR=4.83, CI=3.23-7.23) to be hit in regular season. Mann-Whitney U tests showed significant differences between regular and postseason rotational accelerations (U=2710.00, P=0.03), with higher accelerations during postseason (mean=422422.20, SD±252332.763) than regular season (mean=317905.57, SD±199716.408). Conclusions: Fewer impacts occurred in postseason likely due to higher skill level; however, rotational accelerations may be higher during postseason due to increased athlete speed and power as competition level increased. Keywords: magnitude, frequency, X2 xPatch, intercollegiate.

Faculty Mentor

Tom Bowman and Debbie Bradney

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Apr 5th, 12:00 PM Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Difference between Regular Season and Postseason Impacts of Women’s Soccer

Context: Subconcussive head impacts receive increased attention for brain health. It remains unknown if game type affects frequency or magnitude of head impacts. Objective: Examine relationship between magnitude and frequency of head impacts during regular and postseason soccer games. Setting: Collegiate soccer fields. Participants: 17 women’s soccer athletes (height=163.68±4.99 cm, age=19.88±1.05 years, mass=61.12±5.00 kg) participated in 19 regular and 9 postseason games during 2014 season. Main Outcome Measures: Game type. XPatch sensor (Seattle, WA) collected linear (g) and rotational (deg/sec2) accelerations, Incidence rates (IR) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) determining frequency differences. Mann-Whitney U tests determined magnitude differences because normality assumptions were violated. Results: Regular season participants received almost 1 head impact per exposure (IR=945.95, CI= 835.15-1056.75). Postseason participants received head impacts in approximately 1 out of every 5 exposures (IR=195.49, CI=120.35-270.63). Participants were almost 5 times more likely (IRR=4.83, CI=3.23-7.23) to be hit in regular season. Mann-Whitney U tests showed significant differences between regular and postseason rotational accelerations (U=2710.00, P=0.03), with higher accelerations during postseason (mean=422422.20, SD±252332.763) than regular season (mean=317905.57, SD±199716.408). Conclusions: Fewer impacts occurred in postseason likely due to higher skill level; however, rotational accelerations may be higher during postseason due to increased athlete speed and power as competition level increased. Keywords: magnitude, frequency, X2 xPatch, intercollegiate.