Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Psychology

Abstract

White privilege is something that most people do not often think about or realize exists. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of White privilege awareness (WPA) and perceived efficacy on attitudes toward African Americans. Participants will either be primed with a heightened WPA passage or a race irrelevant control passage and they will also be informed of the probability that their efforts might yield (high vs. low efficacy) before answering a series of questions. I expect to see that the participants in the heightened White privilege awareness condition will have less social distance and that this effect will be larger for the high efficacy group. These anticipated results may imply that having awareness of White privilege and higher efficacy aids in reducing prejudice.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Ei Hlaing, Dr. Virginia Cylke

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Included in

Psychology Commons

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Apr 5th, 9:30 AM Apr 5th, 9:45 AM

Effects of Awareness of White Privilege and Perceived Efficacy on White Americans’ Attitudes

White privilege is something that most people do not often think about or realize exists. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of White privilege awareness (WPA) and perceived efficacy on attitudes toward African Americans. Participants will either be primed with a heightened WPA passage or a race irrelevant control passage and they will also be informed of the probability that their efforts might yield (high vs. low efficacy) before answering a series of questions. I expect to see that the participants in the heightened White privilege awareness condition will have less social distance and that this effect will be larger for the high efficacy group. These anticipated results may imply that having awareness of White privilege and higher efficacy aids in reducing prejudice.