Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Chemistry

Abstract

Teleost axial bones, like in many vertebrates, are composed of calcium hydroxylapatite deposited into a collagen matrix and contribute to transmission of input force from muscles into output propulsive force through fins and spine. During propulsive locomotion such as in predator-escape behavior, the teleost vertebrae experience compressive forces associated with lateral bending of the body, and thus, would go through bone remodeling stimulated by such stressors. In order to test the hypothesis that degree of lateral bending of the body during predator-escape behavior leads to differential assimilation of serum calcium into hydroxylapatite in the vertebrae, we extracted sets of vertebrae from different body regions (upper trunk, mid trunk, lower trunk, and caudal peduncle) that contribute to lateral bending of the body for thrust generation in yellow perch, Perca flavescens. The concentration of calcium in these vertebrae were quantified with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MP-AES). We discuss the implication of our results regarding differential mineralization, material properties, and functional demand in predator-escape behavior.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Takashi Maie, Dr. Pricilla Gannicott

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Apr 5th, 2:00 PM Apr 5th, 2:15 PM

Quantification of Calcium Content in the Vertebrae of Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) via Microwave-induced Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

Teleost axial bones, like in many vertebrates, are composed of calcium hydroxylapatite deposited into a collagen matrix and contribute to transmission of input force from muscles into output propulsive force through fins and spine. During propulsive locomotion such as in predator-escape behavior, the teleost vertebrae experience compressive forces associated with lateral bending of the body, and thus, would go through bone remodeling stimulated by such stressors. In order to test the hypothesis that degree of lateral bending of the body during predator-escape behavior leads to differential assimilation of serum calcium into hydroxylapatite in the vertebrae, we extracted sets of vertebrae from different body regions (upper trunk, mid trunk, lower trunk, and caudal peduncle) that contribute to lateral bending of the body for thrust generation in yellow perch, Perca flavescens. The concentration of calcium in these vertebrae were quantified with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MP-AES). We discuss the implication of our results regarding differential mineralization, material properties, and functional demand in predator-escape behavior.