Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

History

Abstract

English painting between 1485 and 1603 shaped and was shaped by a myriad of cultural influences. Art historians generally agree that because England did not produce much of its own art until the 18th century, it had a relatively slight impact on the development of Western art. A cursory history lesson of this time frame likely omits English art apart from the appearance of Hans Holbein the Younger as court painter under Henry VIII and Nicholas Hilliard during Elizabeth I’s reign. However, a study of English paintings throughout the entire Tudor period reflects its importance not only to England’s political and social history, but also to the development of Western art as well. An investigation of the various uses of art as a display of power, through the iconography and history of individual works, as well as the individuals who patronized the art and utilized this method of creating public images in England will be of concern to people interested in English history and Western art history.

This research examines, both chronologically and thematically, specific works of art and the individuals behind their creation, including the subjects, patrons, and artists. It studies how patrons and subjects utilized art as a means of propaganda and how varying forms of patronage led to the creation and/or importation of different works of art. It also explores the political and social factors that influenced the patronage of these specific works and their contents. This research reflects how English patronage of the arts contributed to the development of western art and how an analysis of specific works leads to a better understanding of their respective time periods as well as their social and political influences and consequences.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Beth Savage, Dr. Scott Amos, Dr. Barbara Rothermel

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Apr 5th, 3:15 PM Apr 5th, 3:30 PM

Displays of Power in English Tudor Painting (1485-1603)

English painting between 1485 and 1603 shaped and was shaped by a myriad of cultural influences. Art historians generally agree that because England did not produce much of its own art until the 18th century, it had a relatively slight impact on the development of Western art. A cursory history lesson of this time frame likely omits English art apart from the appearance of Hans Holbein the Younger as court painter under Henry VIII and Nicholas Hilliard during Elizabeth I’s reign. However, a study of English paintings throughout the entire Tudor period reflects its importance not only to England’s political and social history, but also to the development of Western art as well. An investigation of the various uses of art as a display of power, through the iconography and history of individual works, as well as the individuals who patronized the art and utilized this method of creating public images in England will be of concern to people interested in English history and Western art history.

This research examines, both chronologically and thematically, specific works of art and the individuals behind their creation, including the subjects, patrons, and artists. It studies how patrons and subjects utilized art as a means of propaganda and how varying forms of patronage led to the creation and/or importation of different works of art. It also explores the political and social factors that influenced the patronage of these specific works and their contents. This research reflects how English patronage of the arts contributed to the development of western art and how an analysis of specific works leads to a better understanding of their respective time periods as well as their social and political influences and consequences.