Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Chemistry

Abstract

An assortment of over one hundred sand samples collected by Peter Viemeister in his travels all over the world was donated to the Lynchburg College School of Sciences by his wife after his passing in the hopes that students and faculty alike would find the collection to be useful. This sand collection is on display inside a glass case in Hobbs-Sigler Hall and is a source of beauty due to the multitude of vibrant colors and textures of the sands. In this research, an elemental analysis of a select number of the sand samples of historical interest was conducted to better understand the source of the sand’s beautiful colors. Sand samples were prepared for analysis using a microwave digestion system and subjected to microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy for quantifying metal content. The results of the analysis of select sands collected from locations such as an ancient Mayan ceremonial site, a copper mine, and others will be shared.

Faculty Mentor

Priscilla Gannicott

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Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 1:45 PM

Elemental Analysis of the Viemeister Sand Collection by Microwave-Induced Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

An assortment of over one hundred sand samples collected by Peter Viemeister in his travels all over the world was donated to the Lynchburg College School of Sciences by his wife after his passing in the hopes that students and faculty alike would find the collection to be useful. This sand collection is on display inside a glass case in Hobbs-Sigler Hall and is a source of beauty due to the multitude of vibrant colors and textures of the sands. In this research, an elemental analysis of a select number of the sand samples of historical interest was conducted to better understand the source of the sand’s beautiful colors. Sand samples were prepared for analysis using a microwave digestion system and subjected to microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy for quantifying metal content. The results of the analysis of select sands collected from locations such as an ancient Mayan ceremonial site, a copper mine, and others will be shared.