Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Biomedical Science

Abstract

The anatomy and functional structure of organisms often exhibit a strong correlation with how effectively and efficiently certain biological tasks are performed. This research focused on the relationship between the material properties of the vertebral column (i.e. mineralization) and the kinematics of predator evasion behavior in Perca flavescens. The study tested the hypothesis that specimens residing in calcium scarce environments will uptake more calcium and therefore have stronger vertebrae that allow for more effective predator escape than specimens in calcium rich environments. Specimens were collected from Balm lake and the heavily polluted (calcium-depleted) Birch lake in Minnesota. Using high speed videography, kinematics of the body during predator evasion (C-start) behavior was analyzed and cross referenced with the material properties data gathered from dissected vertebrae using a material testing system. Results revealed that the vertebrae of specimens from Birch lake were significantly stronger and had a higher Young’s modulus. There was no significant difference in the angular excursions of either population, however, Birch lake specimens produced significantly faster acceleration during c-start escape behavior. I discussed the implication of the results for the impact of mineral bioavailability as well as mining-related pollution on the functional morphology and survival of the fish.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Takashi Maie

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Apr 5th, 3:45 PM Apr 5th, 4:00 PM

EVALUATION OF CORRELATION BETWEEN MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF THE VERTEBRAE AND PREDATOR ESCAPE PERFORMANCE IN YELLOW PERCH, PERCA FLAVESCENS

The anatomy and functional structure of organisms often exhibit a strong correlation with how effectively and efficiently certain biological tasks are performed. This research focused on the relationship between the material properties of the vertebral column (i.e. mineralization) and the kinematics of predator evasion behavior in Perca flavescens. The study tested the hypothesis that specimens residing in calcium scarce environments will uptake more calcium and therefore have stronger vertebrae that allow for more effective predator escape than specimens in calcium rich environments. Specimens were collected from Balm lake and the heavily polluted (calcium-depleted) Birch lake in Minnesota. Using high speed videography, kinematics of the body during predator evasion (C-start) behavior was analyzed and cross referenced with the material properties data gathered from dissected vertebrae using a material testing system. Results revealed that the vertebrae of specimens from Birch lake were significantly stronger and had a higher Young’s modulus. There was no significant difference in the angular excursions of either population, however, Birch lake specimens produced significantly faster acceleration during c-start escape behavior. I discussed the implication of the results for the impact of mineral bioavailability as well as mining-related pollution on the functional morphology and survival of the fish.