Poster or Presentation Title

Causal Comparative of Division III Athletes to High-Intensity Functional Fitness Athletes in body composition, Functional, Aerobic, and Anaerobic Capacity

Presenter Information

William G. HyltonFollow

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

The goals of any training method is to improve the performance of an athlete or individual, by increasing their VO2 max, strength, power, and overall functional capacity. There are many different training regimens that aim to improve an athlete’s aerobic, anaerobic, and functional capacity. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare a High-Intensity Functional Training (HIFT) method to a traditional Periodized training (PT) method in order to identify which training method yielded greater increases in an athlete’s aerobic, anaerobic, and functional capacities. METHODS: Twelve subjects (6 NCAA Division III athletes, and 6 HIFT Athletes) underwent two separate sessions following 4 weeks of 3days/week training. In their first session athletes were tested for body composition, functional capacity (FMS screen), aerobic fitness (Queen’s College Step Test), and anaerobic power (WANT test), athletes were then tested again at least one month later to identify any significant increases due to training. It was hypothesized that HIFT athletes will yield higher increases in aerobic fitness and functional capacity, while athletes who underwent a PT method will display greater increases in anaerobic power. The data obtained from this study could be used to determine which training method is more efficient in improving athletic performance, and allow coaches and athletes to visualize how specific aspects of training could improve.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sean Collins

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Causal Comparative of Division III Athletes to High-Intensity Functional Fitness Athletes in body composition, Functional, Aerobic, and Anaerobic Capacity

The goals of any training method is to improve the performance of an athlete or individual, by increasing their VO2 max, strength, power, and overall functional capacity. There are many different training regimens that aim to improve an athlete’s aerobic, anaerobic, and functional capacity. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare a High-Intensity Functional Training (HIFT) method to a traditional Periodized training (PT) method in order to identify which training method yielded greater increases in an athlete’s aerobic, anaerobic, and functional capacities. METHODS: Twelve subjects (6 NCAA Division III athletes, and 6 HIFT Athletes) underwent two separate sessions following 4 weeks of 3days/week training. In their first session athletes were tested for body composition, functional capacity (FMS screen), aerobic fitness (Queen’s College Step Test), and anaerobic power (WANT test), athletes were then tested again at least one month later to identify any significant increases due to training. It was hypothesized that HIFT athletes will yield higher increases in aerobic fitness and functional capacity, while athletes who underwent a PT method will display greater increases in anaerobic power. The data obtained from this study could be used to determine which training method is more efficient in improving athletic performance, and allow coaches and athletes to visualize how specific aspects of training could improve.