Presenter Information

Elise HaugFollow

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Abstract

Background: Concussion is a prevalent injury for student athletes that can have detrimental consequences. Steadiness balance tests are currently used to monitor for concussion. However, on average, athletes return to baseline performance 5-7 days post-concussion, whereas symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, and gait disturbances have been seen for longer. A clinically useful postural stability assessment that is more challenging than steadiness is needed. The NeuroCom VSR sport Limits of Stability Test (LOS) offers more challenge and may be able to monitor symptoms longer in the recovery period. Test-retest reliability needs to be established for young adults.

Purpose: To determine the test-retest reliability of the LOS test in measuring postural stability in the college-aged population

Methods: 27 volunteer participants performed the LOS test on the NeuroCom VSR Sport. Participants completed 2 testing sessions 1 week apart with 4 trials in each.

Analysis: Intraclass Correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined within and between testing sessions.

Results: LOS variables within and between testing sessions demonstrated a high test-retest reliability (ICC = .88 - .96) when performed by young adults. Average scores were different between testing session 1 and session 2 for EPE and DCL with improved performance in the second session.

Clinical Significance: LOS is a reliable test of postural control for young adults. The EPE and DCL variables showed a training effect with some improvement in performance in the second testing session. Therefore, any decrement in performance on a post-test session may be viewed as an abnormal finding.

Faculty Mentor

Theresa Leahy, PT, PhD, NCSE

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Apr 5th, 2:00 PM Apr 5th, 2:15 PM

Test-Retest Reliability of the Limits of Stability test on the NeuroCom VSR Sport

Background: Concussion is a prevalent injury for student athletes that can have detrimental consequences. Steadiness balance tests are currently used to monitor for concussion. However, on average, athletes return to baseline performance 5-7 days post-concussion, whereas symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, and gait disturbances have been seen for longer. A clinically useful postural stability assessment that is more challenging than steadiness is needed. The NeuroCom VSR sport Limits of Stability Test (LOS) offers more challenge and may be able to monitor symptoms longer in the recovery period. Test-retest reliability needs to be established for young adults.

Purpose: To determine the test-retest reliability of the LOS test in measuring postural stability in the college-aged population

Methods: 27 volunteer participants performed the LOS test on the NeuroCom VSR Sport. Participants completed 2 testing sessions 1 week apart with 4 trials in each.

Analysis: Intraclass Correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined within and between testing sessions.

Results: LOS variables within and between testing sessions demonstrated a high test-retest reliability (ICC = .88 - .96) when performed by young adults. Average scores were different between testing session 1 and session 2 for EPE and DCL with improved performance in the second session.

Clinical Significance: LOS is a reliable test of postural control for young adults. The EPE and DCL variables showed a training effect with some improvement in performance in the second testing session. Therefore, any decrement in performance on a post-test session may be viewed as an abnormal finding.