Poster or Presentation Title

"You Trying to Hook Up Tonight?": Investigating the Relationship Between Normative Gender Roles, the Sexual Double Standard, and Affirmative Consent

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Affirmative consent as a standard to minimize negative sexual experiences and improve partner communication during those experiences has undergone minimal empirical scrutiny, despite having been passed into law in at least one state. This study investigates the topic by establishing individual, gender-focused attitudes as potential predictors of consent ideologies with regard to sexual interactions. Participants will be asked to complete the Bem sex-role inventory (Holt & Ellis, 1998) to determine attitudes toward traditional gender roles, and Milhausen and Herold's (2001) Personal Acceptance of the Double Standard Scale to establish attitudes toward the traditional sexual double standard. These responses will then be compared to attitudes toward various sexual consent beliefs and behaviors that are either consistent or inconsistent with the affirmative consent standard, as determined by Humphreys and Brousseau's (2010) Revised Sexual Consent Scale. The study hypothesizes that an overall preference for traditional gender roles and the sexual double standard will serve as significant predictors of consent behaviors that are less consistent with the affirmative consent standard. Support for this hypothesis could potentially lead to a stronger foundation for the communication standard overall, as well as aid individuals in romantic situations to identify potential consent ideologies in a sexual partner.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Ei Hlaing and Dr. Virginia Cylke

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"You Trying to Hook Up Tonight?": Investigating the Relationship Between Normative Gender Roles, the Sexual Double Standard, and Affirmative Consent

Affirmative consent as a standard to minimize negative sexual experiences and improve partner communication during those experiences has undergone minimal empirical scrutiny, despite having been passed into law in at least one state. This study investigates the topic by establishing individual, gender-focused attitudes as potential predictors of consent ideologies with regard to sexual interactions. Participants will be asked to complete the Bem sex-role inventory (Holt & Ellis, 1998) to determine attitudes toward traditional gender roles, and Milhausen and Herold's (2001) Personal Acceptance of the Double Standard Scale to establish attitudes toward the traditional sexual double standard. These responses will then be compared to attitudes toward various sexual consent beliefs and behaviors that are either consistent or inconsistent with the affirmative consent standard, as determined by Humphreys and Brousseau's (2010) Revised Sexual Consent Scale. The study hypothesizes that an overall preference for traditional gender roles and the sexual double standard will serve as significant predictors of consent behaviors that are less consistent with the affirmative consent standard. Support for this hypothesis could potentially lead to a stronger foundation for the communication standard overall, as well as aid individuals in romantic situations to identify potential consent ideologies in a sexual partner.