Poster or Presentation Title

Frictional Vibrations in Hard Court and Rubber Interactions

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Physics

Abstract

Due to recent developments in tennis, sliding has become more predominant in the sport, even on hard surface courts. The vibrations from friction between shoes and the surface are having a greater impact on the game. The exact effects of frictional vibrations on sliding capabilities are unknown but they were identified and analyzed to determine if there is some detrimental or supplemental effect based on the pattern of the rubber on the shoe’s sole. First, I used the ANOVA (analysis of variance) for a single factor statistical analysis method to identify if there is in fact a limiting hole to area ratio for the coefficient of static friction as implied by preliminary tests. The data was analyzed to determine if there existed frictional vibrations, which are seen in interactions between ice/snow and skis and are known to influence sliding capabilities. A critical hole ratio was found between 0.227 and 0.288 which was shown in the static coefficient of friction, where prior to the critical ratio the static coefficient was higher than after the critical ratio. This critical hole ratio was also seen in the kinetic friction vibrations where the amplitude of the vibrations increased significantly across the critical hole ratio.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Eric Goff

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Frictional Vibrations in Hard Court and Rubber Interactions

Due to recent developments in tennis, sliding has become more predominant in the sport, even on hard surface courts. The vibrations from friction between shoes and the surface are having a greater impact on the game. The exact effects of frictional vibrations on sliding capabilities are unknown but they were identified and analyzed to determine if there is some detrimental or supplemental effect based on the pattern of the rubber on the shoe’s sole. First, I used the ANOVA (analysis of variance) for a single factor statistical analysis method to identify if there is in fact a limiting hole to area ratio for the coefficient of static friction as implied by preliminary tests. The data was analyzed to determine if there existed frictional vibrations, which are seen in interactions between ice/snow and skis and are known to influence sliding capabilities. A critical hole ratio was found between 0.227 and 0.288 which was shown in the static coefficient of friction, where prior to the critical ratio the static coefficient was higher than after the critical ratio. This critical hole ratio was also seen in the kinetic friction vibrations where the amplitude of the vibrations increased significantly across the critical hole ratio.