Poster or Presentation Title

The Effects of Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation on Cervical Joint Position Error

Presenter Information

Kelley E. SmithFollow

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2017

End Date

April 2017

Department

Biomedical Science

Abstract

The cervical spine is a common site for pain, but manipulation of the cervical spine has been shown to involve some risks for the patient. Thoracic thrust manipulation, in comparison, has been used as an alternative therapeutic mechanism to reduce pain in the cervical spine and has additionally demonstrated an increase in cervical range of motion and decrease in disability. However, there is limited research on how thoracic manipulation affects cervical proprioception. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of mid-thoracic spine thrust manipulation on cervical joint position error. Cervical joint position error measures cervical afferent input to detect abnormalities in proprioception and the ability to reposition one’s neck and head back to a neutral head position after movement in a certain direction. Joint position error was tested with a laser pointer and GoPro secured on the forehead of the subjects and requiring the subjects to relocate their head back to neutral after maximal left rotation, right rotation, flexion, and extension with vision occluded. Images were captured with the GoPro, data was obtained from the images, and this data was used to determine constant, absolute, and variable errors before and after the manipulation.

Faculty Mentor

Gary Austin, Nancy Cowden, Jill Lucas

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Apr 5th, 11:15 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

The Effects of Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation on Cervical Joint Position Error

The cervical spine is a common site for pain, but manipulation of the cervical spine has been shown to involve some risks for the patient. Thoracic thrust manipulation, in comparison, has been used as an alternative therapeutic mechanism to reduce pain in the cervical spine and has additionally demonstrated an increase in cervical range of motion and decrease in disability. However, there is limited research on how thoracic manipulation affects cervical proprioception. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of mid-thoracic spine thrust manipulation on cervical joint position error. Cervical joint position error measures cervical afferent input to detect abnormalities in proprioception and the ability to reposition one’s neck and head back to a neutral head position after movement in a certain direction. Joint position error was tested with a laser pointer and GoPro secured on the forehead of the subjects and requiring the subjects to relocate their head back to neutral after maximal left rotation, right rotation, flexion, and extension with vision occluded. Images were captured with the GoPro, data was obtained from the images, and this data was used to determine constant, absolute, and variable errors before and after the manipulation.