Diagnostic Criteria for Cervicogenic Headaches: A Critical Appraisal

Meaghan C. Dullea, Lynchburg College
JuanPablo Duran, Lynchburg College

Abstract

When diagnosing headaches, there are multiple procedures that can assist clinicians in confirming the presence of a specific type of headache originating from the cervical spine, called cervicogenic headache, versus the other many forms of headaches. Based on the current research, the strongest diagnostic procedure for CGH is the cervical flexion-rotation test with a positive result being approximately less than or equal to 30-32°. In addition to this, studies have found that reduced cervical flexion and extension, painful C1-C3 palpation, and reduced muscle extensibility of suboccipital extensors, upper trapezius, scalenes and levator scapulae can be used as clusters in order to further inform a diagnosis of CGH. Due to these findings, experienced clinicians will likely be able to positively identify CGH. In order to improve clinicians’ diagnostic abilities for CGH, further research would be beneficial to be able to differentiate the diagnosis of CGH in patients with previous neck injuries, cervical radicular pain, and other populations that were excluded in these studies.

 
Apr 6th, 11:30 AM Apr 6th, 11:45 AM

Diagnostic Criteria for Cervicogenic Headaches: A Critical Appraisal

Hopwood Auditorium

When diagnosing headaches, there are multiple procedures that can assist clinicians in confirming the presence of a specific type of headache originating from the cervical spine, called cervicogenic headache, versus the other many forms of headaches. Based on the current research, the strongest diagnostic procedure for CGH is the cervical flexion-rotation test with a positive result being approximately less than or equal to 30-32°. In addition to this, studies have found that reduced cervical flexion and extension, painful C1-C3 palpation, and reduced muscle extensibility of suboccipital extensors, upper trapezius, scalenes and levator scapulae can be used as clusters in order to further inform a diagnosis of CGH. Due to these findings, experienced clinicians will likely be able to positively identify CGH. In order to improve clinicians’ diagnostic abilities for CGH, further research would be beneficial to be able to differentiate the diagnosis of CGH in patients with previous neck injuries, cervical radicular pain, and other populations that were excluded in these studies.

http://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2017/presentations/94