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Lynchburg Journal of Medical Science

Lynchburg Journal of Medical Science

Specialty

Primary Care PA-C

Advisor

Dr Tom Colletti, DHSc,PA-C

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Objective

One of the common problems faced in medical applications is Chronic Lower Back Pain (CLBP). In any portion of the difficult, interrelated series of connections of the spinal muscles, nerves, bones, discs or tendons in the lumbar spine, LBP can be caused by quite some issues. The purpose of this article is to review evidence-based treatment options because there is contradictory evidence of the efficacy of integrated medicine for patients with lower back pain (LBP) in improving their activities in daily living.

Methods

Evidence-Based research was conducted on many online databases related to the topic, including PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL Chinese database, and Cochrane database were reviewed. Research to include the school and work librarians, school research coordinator, and the writing center for structural support.

Results

Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed as a basis for the research. Outcomes included reduction or elimination of low back pain improvement in back-specific and overall function, improvement in health-related quality of life, reduction in work disability and return to work, global improvement, number of back pain episodes or time between episodes, patient satisfaction, and adverse effects of interventions. The effects on patient function generally were smaller than those on pain medication, and most evidence was for chronic low back pain. New studies and evidence support the efficacy of mind-body interventions.

Other nonpharmacologic therapies for low back pain were linked with small to moderate, primarily short-term outcomes on pain. More research is needed to identify the effective nonpharmacologic treatments for radicular and acute low back pain, to understand the incremental benefits of combining interventions and determine which treatment combinations and directives are most effective.

Conclusion

Nonpharmacologic therapies for low back pain were linked with small to moderate, primarily short-term outcomes on pain. The effects on patient function generally were smaller than those on pain medication, and most evidence was for chronic low back pain. New studies and evidence support the efficacy of mind-body interventions.

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