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Lynchburg Journal of Medical Science

Lynchburg Journal of Medical Science

Specialty

Neurosurgery

Advisor

Dr. Colletti

Abstract

Spinal Cord Stimulators are commonplace in the Neurosurgical treatment of mechanical back pain unresponsive to conservative management including pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and non-surgical treatment. There are a small amount of similar studies regarding erroneously placed medical devices placed in the intramedullary space. The ones that have been found are not specifically from a Spinal Cord Stimulator (SCS) percutaneous wire. In this case report, a woman had a SCS percutaneous wire placed into both the intramedullary space and the intradural space of the spinal cord. She was found to have immediate symptoms of lower extremity pain, numbness, and tingling following her procedure. Follow up imaging to confirm the placement of the SCS appropriately was done two days after the patient was discharged. The patient suffered damages to her spinal cord and injury that may be permanent due to the placement of the spinal cord stimulator in the spinal cord itself. It is important to understand the implications of this medical error and can be used as an opportunity to learn about the resiliency of the spinal cord in relation to iatrogenic damage and the course of recovery.

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