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Lynchburg Journal of Medical Science

Lynchburg Journal of Medical Science

Specialty

Occupational Medicine and Family Medicine

Advisor

Dr. Larry Herman

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Objective:

Elevated levels of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) at industrial workplaces increase the risk of lung cancer, damage to the nasal and oral mucosa, skin irritation, and breathing problems in workers. An in depth review of the current surveillance practices available to physician assistants (PAs) will identify the most effective adverse health effects monitoring protocols and elevated Cr(VI) biomarkers.

Methods:

PubMed, Medline, Google scholar literature search, and OSHA’s online resources were used to provide the most current occupational health standards and guidance.

Results:

There is new evidence that chromium in erythrocytes (Cr-RBC) is a more accurate biomarker for medical surveillance of workers exposed to Cr(VI).

Conclusion:

At high levels Cr(VI) can cause damage to the nasal and oral mucosa, skin irritation, and lung cancer. Although urine, plasma, and erythrocytes markers are good indicators of internal chromium, more work needs to be done to validate the role of Cr-RBC in Cr(VI) exposure biomonitoring.

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