Location

Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 1:00 PM

Abstract

Lacrosse is a growing sport in the United States. Comparing magnitude and frequency across sex based on impact mechanism will provide data for injury-prevention techniques and risk reduction for head injuries. The objective is to compare the differences in magnitude and frequency of head impact mechanisms in NCAA Division III intercollegiate lacrosse athletes. 16 male and 15 female intercollegiate lacrosse athletes participated in the study. Participants wore an xPatch sensor during every event for the 2015 season. Film footage from each event was synchronized with time of each head impact for verification. Sex and mechanism are the independent variables. Linear and rotational accelerations determined impact magnitudes. We calculated incidence rates, incidence rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals to determine frequency differences. We found a significant interaction between impact mechanism and sex, and main effects for mechanism and sex. The most common mechanism in men’s lacrosse was head to body. Stick to head was the most common mechanism is women’s lacrosse. Both most common mechanisms are penalties, but occur frequently suggesting to stress rule enforcement. Since mechanism and sex affect magnitude of head impacts, proper offensive and defensive techniques against opponents should be encouraged to reduce head impacts.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Thomas G. (Tom) Bowman

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Apr 6th, 12:00 PM Apr 6th, 1:00 PM

Difference in Mechanism of Head Impacts Measured between Men's and Women's Intercollegiate Lacrosse Athletes

Memorial Ballroom

Lacrosse is a growing sport in the United States. Comparing magnitude and frequency across sex based on impact mechanism will provide data for injury-prevention techniques and risk reduction for head injuries. The objective is to compare the differences in magnitude and frequency of head impact mechanisms in NCAA Division III intercollegiate lacrosse athletes. 16 male and 15 female intercollegiate lacrosse athletes participated in the study. Participants wore an xPatch sensor during every event for the 2015 season. Film footage from each event was synchronized with time of each head impact for verification. Sex and mechanism are the independent variables. Linear and rotational accelerations determined impact magnitudes. We calculated incidence rates, incidence rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals to determine frequency differences. We found a significant interaction between impact mechanism and sex, and main effects for mechanism and sex. The most common mechanism in men’s lacrosse was head to body. Stick to head was the most common mechanism is women’s lacrosse. Both most common mechanisms are penalties, but occur frequently suggesting to stress rule enforcement. Since mechanism and sex affect magnitude of head impacts, proper offensive and defensive techniques against opponents should be encouraged to reduce head impacts.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2016/Posters/16