Location

Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 1:00 PM

Abstract

There has been growing interest in head impacts related to sports participation due to long and short term consequences of head injuries. The objective was to compare magnitude and frequency between intercollegiate Division III soccer players based on head impact mechanisms. There were 17 female and 14 male NCAA Division III soccer players who participated by wearing xPatch sensors during soccer activity. Each practice and game was video recorded in order to confirm head impacts. The independent variable of this study was impact mechanism (head to head, head to body (other than head), head to ground, ball to head, goal to head, combination, and unknown). Sensors collected linear and angular accelerations and frequency of head impacts. The interaction between sex and mechanism was significant for rotational accelerations (P=.005).The highest head impact incidence rate for men was head to body (IR=523.10) while ball to head was the highest for women (IR=666.67, IRR=1.90). Rotational accelerations appear more dependent on sex and mechanism, perhaps due to athlete strength and size differences. Head to body contact is illegal in soccer suggesting an increased emphasis on rule enforcement during games and practices is warranted.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Thomas G. (Tom) Bowman

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Apr 6th, 12:00 PM Apr 6th, 1:00 PM

The Effects of Mechanism on Head Impacts in Soccer Athletes

Memorial Ballroom

There has been growing interest in head impacts related to sports participation due to long and short term consequences of head injuries. The objective was to compare magnitude and frequency between intercollegiate Division III soccer players based on head impact mechanisms. There were 17 female and 14 male NCAA Division III soccer players who participated by wearing xPatch sensors during soccer activity. Each practice and game was video recorded in order to confirm head impacts. The independent variable of this study was impact mechanism (head to head, head to body (other than head), head to ground, ball to head, goal to head, combination, and unknown). Sensors collected linear and angular accelerations and frequency of head impacts. The interaction between sex and mechanism was significant for rotational accelerations (P=.005).The highest head impact incidence rate for men was head to body (IR=523.10) while ball to head was the highest for women (IR=666.67, IRR=1.90). Rotational accelerations appear more dependent on sex and mechanism, perhaps due to athlete strength and size differences. Head to body contact is illegal in soccer suggesting an increased emphasis on rule enforcement during games and practices is warranted.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2016/Posters/17