Location

Schewel Hall Room 232

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 1:15 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 1:30 PM

Abstract

When animals grow, the functional demands that they experience often change as a consequence of their increasing body size. In this study, we examined the feeding morphology and biomechanics of esocid species that represent three size classes (Redfin pickerel, Esox americanus; Chain pickerel, Esox niger; Northern pike, Esox lucius) and how their bite forces change as they grow. In order to evaluate bite performance through ontogeny, we measured dimensions of the feeding apparatus and the jaw closing muscles across a wide range of body sizes. The collected morphological data was used as input variables for the anatomical model to simulate jaw function in these species. The peak bite forces estimated for the largest individual of each esocid species were: 2.29 N (frontal) and 5.04 N (deep bite) for Esox americanus (Total Body Length = 21.4 cm); 1.93 N (frontal) and 4.45 N (deep) for Esox niger (TBL = 24.4 cm); 26.7 N (frontal) and 60.5 N (deep) for Esox lucius (TBL = 59.1 cm). Our study provides insights into not only the musculoskeletal basis of the jaw function in esocid species, but also the feeding capacity of these species in relation to the functional demands they face during ontogeny.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Takashi Maie

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Apr 6th, 1:15 PM Apr 6th, 1:30 PM

Comparative lever analysis and ontogenetic scaling in esocid fishes: functional demands and constraints in feeding biomechanics

Schewel Hall Room 232

When animals grow, the functional demands that they experience often change as a consequence of their increasing body size. In this study, we examined the feeding morphology and biomechanics of esocid species that represent three size classes (Redfin pickerel, Esox americanus; Chain pickerel, Esox niger; Northern pike, Esox lucius) and how their bite forces change as they grow. In order to evaluate bite performance through ontogeny, we measured dimensions of the feeding apparatus and the jaw closing muscles across a wide range of body sizes. The collected morphological data was used as input variables for the anatomical model to simulate jaw function in these species. The peak bite forces estimated for the largest individual of each esocid species were: 2.29 N (frontal) and 5.04 N (deep bite) for Esox americanus (Total Body Length = 21.4 cm); 1.93 N (frontal) and 4.45 N (deep) for Esox niger (TBL = 24.4 cm); 26.7 N (frontal) and 60.5 N (deep) for Esox lucius (TBL = 59.1 cm). Our study provides insights into not only the musculoskeletal basis of the jaw function in esocid species, but also the feeding capacity of these species in relation to the functional demands they face during ontogeny.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2016/Presentations/25