Poster or Presentation Title

Open Source 3-D Printed Syringe Pump

Location

Schewel Hall Room 222

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

6-4-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

Syringes are a useful piece of equipment in chemistry labs for introducing precise amounts of any liquid to a reaction. Inherent to the use of a syringe is that humans cannot dispense liquid at a constant rate, and often in a lab setting a syringe pump is used to control the rate of application. Commercial quality syringe pumps are often expensive and difficult to maintain. The goal of this study was to utilize open-source designs for syringe pumps with components generated from a 3D printer to create a pump that could perform comparably to a commercial quality pump. To begin, we found two different platforms (Raspberry Pi and Arduino : a microcomputer and microcontroller respectively) that could power and operate the components once assembled into a robust design. Once assembled, tests for accuracy and precision were conducted using DI water and an analytical balance. Finally, an undergraduate organic lab exercise was designed to demonstrate the versatility of an affordable syringe pump and tested several times to ensure maximum learning potential of SN1, SN2, E1, and E2 reactions.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jason B. Crumpton

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Apr 6th, 10:15 AM Apr 6th, 10:30 AM

Open Source 3-D Printed Syringe Pump

Schewel Hall Room 222

Syringes are a useful piece of equipment in chemistry labs for introducing precise amounts of any liquid to a reaction. Inherent to the use of a syringe is that humans cannot dispense liquid at a constant rate, and often in a lab setting a syringe pump is used to control the rate of application. Commercial quality syringe pumps are often expensive and difficult to maintain. The goal of this study was to utilize open-source designs for syringe pumps with components generated from a 3D printer to create a pump that could perform comparably to a commercial quality pump. To begin, we found two different platforms (Raspberry Pi and Arduino : a microcomputer and microcontroller respectively) that could power and operate the components once assembled into a robust design. Once assembled, tests for accuracy and precision were conducted using DI water and an analytical balance. Finally, an undergraduate organic lab exercise was designed to demonstrate the versatility of an affordable syringe pump and tested several times to ensure maximum learning potential of SN1, SN2, E1, and E2 reactions.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2016/Presentations/28