Poster or Presentation Title

Roles of Special Educators in St. Lucia

Location

Sydnor Performance Hall

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 3:15 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 3:30 PM

Abstract

This study sought to examine the roles of primary and secondary school special educators in St. Lucia and the factors that affect those roles. A survey, consisting of 85 Likert-scale statements along five closed ended questions, was administered to the population of 82 special educators in St. Lucia. The quantitative data collected was analyzed descriptively and inferentially. The results revealed that special educators engaged in all the roles under study (Academic Instruction, Non-academic Instruction, Instructional Support, Responsive Behavior Management, Special Education Assessment, Classroom Assessment, Special Education Paperwork, attendance of SENT meetings) and perceived all roles to be very-to-extremely important. However, primary teachers were more inclined to attend Special Education and Needs Teachers’ (SENT) meetings, while secondary educators were more likely to engage in Classroom Assessment roles. Special educators teach utilizing a continuum of practices from exclusionary to inclusionary, but make greater use of exclusionary practices. Their practice is guided by moderately helpful policies and sustained by moderate principal support. Several recommendations are made to improve practice.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Edward A. Polloway

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Apr 6th, 3:15 PM Apr 6th, 3:30 PM

Roles of Special Educators in St. Lucia

Sydnor Performance Hall

This study sought to examine the roles of primary and secondary school special educators in St. Lucia and the factors that affect those roles. A survey, consisting of 85 Likert-scale statements along five closed ended questions, was administered to the population of 82 special educators in St. Lucia. The quantitative data collected was analyzed descriptively and inferentially. The results revealed that special educators engaged in all the roles under study (Academic Instruction, Non-academic Instruction, Instructional Support, Responsive Behavior Management, Special Education Assessment, Classroom Assessment, Special Education Paperwork, attendance of SENT meetings) and perceived all roles to be very-to-extremely important. However, primary teachers were more inclined to attend Special Education and Needs Teachers’ (SENT) meetings, while secondary educators were more likely to engage in Classroom Assessment roles. Special educators teach utilizing a continuum of practices from exclusionary to inclusionary, but make greater use of exclusionary practices. Their practice is guided by moderately helpful policies and sustained by moderate principal support. Several recommendations are made to improve practice.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2016/Presentations/33