Location

Schewel Hall Room 231

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 3:15 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 3:30 PM

Abstract

The national movement of “tough on crime” in the mid-1990s was an initiative in respond to the public outcry about record-high crime rates. Twenty years after initial parole abolition, the national reported violent crime rate decreased 33.4 percent and the property crime rate decreased 42.7 percent. This paper uses interdisciplinary normative and empirical tools to examine the impact of parole abolition on reported crime rates. This time-series regression analysis reveals a surprising conclusion - as parole becomes more limited, reported violent and property crime rates actually have a slight increase. The policy change from having full discretionary parole to no parole is approximately 14 more violent crimes per 100,000 about 101 more property crimes per 100,000. Communicative approaches with “smart on crime” alternatives mend the gap between retributive and consequential based philosophies.The conclusion promotes more effective and efficient “smart on crime” policies that encompass community-building bridge the gap between retributivist and consequentialist-based philosophies.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Timothy Meinke, Dr. Laura Kicklighter, Dr. Thomas Brickhouse

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Apr 6th, 3:15 PM Apr 6th, 3:30 PM

Does Parole Abolition Lead to a Decrease in Reported Crime Rates?

Schewel Hall Room 231

The national movement of “tough on crime” in the mid-1990s was an initiative in respond to the public outcry about record-high crime rates. Twenty years after initial parole abolition, the national reported violent crime rate decreased 33.4 percent and the property crime rate decreased 42.7 percent. This paper uses interdisciplinary normative and empirical tools to examine the impact of parole abolition on reported crime rates. This time-series regression analysis reveals a surprising conclusion - as parole becomes more limited, reported violent and property crime rates actually have a slight increase. The policy change from having full discretionary parole to no parole is approximately 14 more violent crimes per 100,000 about 101 more property crimes per 100,000. Communicative approaches with “smart on crime” alternatives mend the gap between retributive and consequential based philosophies.The conclusion promotes more effective and efficient “smart on crime” policies that encompass community-building bridge the gap between retributivist and consequentialist-based philosophies.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2017/presentations/100