Poster or Presentation Title

Relationship Between Self-Reported Fatigue, Sleep Quantity, and Baseline Neurocognitive Test Scores

Presenter Information

Bryanna GarrettFollow

Location

Hall Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 12:00 PM

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Context: Concussion baseline testing is important for athletic trainers because it provides patients’ normal cognitive, physical, and behavioral states. Concussion baseline testing might be difficult for athletes who are mentally or physically tired and provide an inadequate measure of typical function. Capturing baseline data that does not represent best performance may result in inappropriate clinical decisions post-injury. Objective: To assess the relationship between self-reported fatigue, sleep quantity, and CNS Vital Signs (CNSVS) neurocognitive testing subsection scores. Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: Computer lab. Participants: A total of 159 (N=71 females, N=86 males, N=2 unspecified; age=19.17±1.150 years) voluntarily consented to participate in the study. Participants played soccer (N=72), basketball (N=2), lacrosse (N=83), and Unspecified (N=2) . Interventions: CNS Vital Signs neurocognitive testing subsection scores (reaction time, visual memory, verbal memory, executive function) served as the independent variables. Main Outcome Measures: Self-Reported fatigue ratings and sleep quantity served as the dependent variables. We determined self-reported fatigue on a scale that ranged from 0-100, 100 being completely awake and 0 being extremely exhausted. We used multiple linear regression to determine the relationship between the 4 subscales of CNSVS and each of the two dependent variables. Results: Average self-reported fatigue scores were 72.70±18.50 (range=15-100) and the number of sleep quantity 6.70±1.40 (range=4-11). We found a non-significant regression equation (F= 4,149 =.300, P=.870) using the 4 CNSVS subsection scores to predict participants’ self-reported fatigue rating. There was also a non-significant regression equation (F= 4,149 =1.300, P=.270) between sleep quantity and the 4 CNSVS subsection scores. Conclusion: Variations in self-reported fatigue ratings and sleep quantity do not alter neurocognitive performance as measured by the CNSVS subsection scores.

Faculty Mentor

Thomas Bowman

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 12:00 PM

Relationship Between Self-Reported Fatigue, Sleep Quantity, and Baseline Neurocognitive Test Scores

Hall Memorial Ballroom

Context: Concussion baseline testing is important for athletic trainers because it provides patients’ normal cognitive, physical, and behavioral states. Concussion baseline testing might be difficult for athletes who are mentally or physically tired and provide an inadequate measure of typical function. Capturing baseline data that does not represent best performance may result in inappropriate clinical decisions post-injury. Objective: To assess the relationship between self-reported fatigue, sleep quantity, and CNS Vital Signs (CNSVS) neurocognitive testing subsection scores. Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: Computer lab. Participants: A total of 159 (N=71 females, N=86 males, N=2 unspecified; age=19.17±1.150 years) voluntarily consented to participate in the study. Participants played soccer (N=72), basketball (N=2), lacrosse (N=83), and Unspecified (N=2) . Interventions: CNS Vital Signs neurocognitive testing subsection scores (reaction time, visual memory, verbal memory, executive function) served as the independent variables. Main Outcome Measures: Self-Reported fatigue ratings and sleep quantity served as the dependent variables. We determined self-reported fatigue on a scale that ranged from 0-100, 100 being completely awake and 0 being extremely exhausted. We used multiple linear regression to determine the relationship between the 4 subscales of CNSVS and each of the two dependent variables. Results: Average self-reported fatigue scores were 72.70±18.50 (range=15-100) and the number of sleep quantity 6.70±1.40 (range=4-11). We found a non-significant regression equation (F= 4,149 =.300, P=.870) using the 4 CNSVS subsection scores to predict participants’ self-reported fatigue rating. There was also a non-significant regression equation (F= 4,149 =1.300, P=.270) between sleep quantity and the 4 CNSVS subsection scores. Conclusion: Variations in self-reported fatigue ratings and sleep quantity do not alter neurocognitive performance as measured by the CNSVS subsection scores.