Poster or Presentation Title

Predictors of sleep quality: Depression, anxiety, and sleep self-efficacy

Presenter Information

Rayanna JohnsonFollow

Location

Hall Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 12:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Sleep plays an important role in daily functioning and cognitive abilities, but despite this college students continue to struggle to get enough sleep. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of depression, anxiety, and sleep self-efficacy on sleep quality in college students using both objective and self-report data. Participants wore an ActiGraph wGT3X-BT wristband for a period of seven nights, and completed four questionnaires indicating their levels of anxiety, depression, sleep self-efficacy, and sleep quality. This study compared low and high sleep self-efficacy groups on depression scores, anxiety scores, and sleep duration using both the data provided by the ActiGraph wGT3X-BT and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Predictor variables for efficient sleeping habits using night-to-night sleep variability were also identified.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Ei Hlaing

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 12:00 PM

Predictors of sleep quality: Depression, anxiety, and sleep self-efficacy

Hall Memorial Ballroom

Sleep plays an important role in daily functioning and cognitive abilities, but despite this college students continue to struggle to get enough sleep. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of depression, anxiety, and sleep self-efficacy on sleep quality in college students using both objective and self-report data. Participants wore an ActiGraph wGT3X-BT wristband for a period of seven nights, and completed four questionnaires indicating their levels of anxiety, depression, sleep self-efficacy, and sleep quality. This study compared low and high sleep self-efficacy groups on depression scores, anxiety scores, and sleep duration using both the data provided by the ActiGraph wGT3X-BT and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Predictor variables for efficient sleeping habits using night-to-night sleep variability were also identified.