Location

Schewel Hall Room 232

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 3:00 PM

Abstract

The study will examine gender in the workplace, focusing on the impact of gender in a scenario where one fails at their occupational duties. Women have been making significant strides in the past few decades to achieve a higher level of equality in the workplace. However, the glass ceiling is believed to continuously hold women back in particular occupations. Additionally, certain occupations have become associated with a particular gender. When one enters into a gender incongruent occupation they may face higher levels of scrutiny. The present study will focus on attribution theory which describes why certain types of people are given a particular set of attributes in evaluations. The participants will be presented a series of vignettes which depict either a male or female on the job (as either a nurse, teacher, CEO, or police officer) in which a significant mistake is made (a patient going into cardiac arrest, losing a student on a field trip, making an accounting error leading to a tax audit, or allowing a suspect to escape). The results should support the hypothesis that when one is in a gender incongruent occupation, attribution theory puts them at a disadvantage in workplace performance evaluations.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Virginia A. Cylke

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Apr 6th, 2:45 PM Apr 6th, 3:00 PM

It's Not Your Fault, it's Your Gender: Blame in the Workplace as it is Attributable to Gender

Schewel Hall Room 232

The study will examine gender in the workplace, focusing on the impact of gender in a scenario where one fails at their occupational duties. Women have been making significant strides in the past few decades to achieve a higher level of equality in the workplace. However, the glass ceiling is believed to continuously hold women back in particular occupations. Additionally, certain occupations have become associated with a particular gender. When one enters into a gender incongruent occupation they may face higher levels of scrutiny. The present study will focus on attribution theory which describes why certain types of people are given a particular set of attributes in evaluations. The participants will be presented a series of vignettes which depict either a male or female on the job (as either a nurse, teacher, CEO, or police officer) in which a significant mistake is made (a patient going into cardiac arrest, losing a student on a field trip, making an accounting error leading to a tax audit, or allowing a suspect to escape). The results should support the hypothesis that when one is in a gender incongruent occupation, attribution theory puts them at a disadvantage in workplace performance evaluations.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2018/presentations/104