Poster or Presentation Title

Cranial Nerves XIII and XIV

Presenter Information

Benjamin GiustinianiFollow

Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 9:45 AM

Department

Biology

Abstract

The cranial nerves in vertebrates originate from the brain and brainstem and innervate sensory and motor functions of the head and neck. In humans, there are twelve pairs of well-described CNs that contribute to function of special senses (vision, smell, taste, hearing and equilibrium), general senses, and voluntary and involuntary muscles. In addition, there are two more cranial nerves that are anatomically independent of the CN I through CN XII, but have been under-recognized. The CN XIII is referred to as the terminal nerve (nervus terminalis) or zero nerve, and may be involved in sexual behavior as a way to sense pheromones in mammalian species. The CN XIV is referred to as the intermediary nerve or intermediate nerve, and runs concurrently with the facial nerve (CN VII). With a series of dissections on human cadavers and some other vertebrate specimens, we recognized and mapped these cranial nerves. We will discuss the functional and evolutionary implication of our comparative evaluation of these cranial nerves.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Takashi Maie

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Apr 4th, 9:45 AM

Cranial Nerves XIII and XIV

Schewel 232

The cranial nerves in vertebrates originate from the brain and brainstem and innervate sensory and motor functions of the head and neck. In humans, there are twelve pairs of well-described CNs that contribute to function of special senses (vision, smell, taste, hearing and equilibrium), general senses, and voluntary and involuntary muscles. In addition, there are two more cranial nerves that are anatomically independent of the CN I through CN XII, but have been under-recognized. The CN XIII is referred to as the terminal nerve (nervus terminalis) or zero nerve, and may be involved in sexual behavior as a way to sense pheromones in mammalian species. The CN XIV is referred to as the intermediary nerve or intermediate nerve, and runs concurrently with the facial nerve (CN VII). With a series of dissections on human cadavers and some other vertebrate specimens, we recognized and mapped these cranial nerves. We will discuss the functional and evolutionary implication of our comparative evaluation of these cranial nerves.