Presenter Information

Nathan HopkinsFollow

Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 9:15 AM

Department

Chemistry

Abstract

Global agriculture is beset by numerous challenges which must be surmounted to feed a developing world, from combating climate change to the cultivation of sustainable food products. This, in addition to protein and nutrient deficiencies in the developing world, makes considering alternative protein sources, such as a crickets, an attractive option. Crickets use a fraction of the land and water that protein sources like beef cattle do, and can be cultivated in urban environments in stacked boxes. This research investigation aims to quantify the nutrient mineral content (Iron, Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, and Magnesium) of two cricket species (Acheta domesticus & Gryllodes sigillatus) and commercial cricket protein bars (from Chapul Inc.) using Microwave-Plasma induced Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES).

Faculty Mentor

Priscilla Gannicott, John Styrsky

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Apr 4th, 9:15 AM

Eating Crickets? Nutrient Mineral Content of two cricket species and Chapul cricket protein bars using MP-AES

Schewel 232

Global agriculture is beset by numerous challenges which must be surmounted to feed a developing world, from combating climate change to the cultivation of sustainable food products. This, in addition to protein and nutrient deficiencies in the developing world, makes considering alternative protein sources, such as a crickets, an attractive option. Crickets use a fraction of the land and water that protein sources like beef cattle do, and can be cultivated in urban environments in stacked boxes. This research investigation aims to quantify the nutrient mineral content (Iron, Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, and Magnesium) of two cricket species (Acheta domesticus & Gryllodes sigillatus) and commercial cricket protein bars (from Chapul Inc.) using Microwave-Plasma induced Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES).