Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 9:00 AM

Department

Physical Therapy

Abstract

The field of physical therapy is swiftly transitioning from a formulaic biomedical model to a patient-centered biopsychosocial model, requiring clinicians to view their patients as a whole instead of as a sum of their parts. Integration of this concept into graduate health science education is variable across professions and amongst the same professional programs. Lynchburg College’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is pioneering an experiential learning course for graduate-level PT programs. “The Art of Anatomical Dissection: From Ancient Rome to the Renaissance” will transport students to the land of Da Vinci and Michelangelo, to study how the innovations of these men and others shaped the way we live today. From anatomical discoveries to breakthroughs in art mastery, the human body became a source of inspiration in all fields. Students will assess anatomical accuracy of some of the most famous art pieces in the world and reflect on the historic and cultural significance of that anatomy with regards to PT practice. Our presentation will focus on the impact this course is having on the students enrolled and how they will be able to use the experience to enrich their learning in the PT curriculum. Studies from MD programs currently employing this approach have exhibited students with a better ability to appreciate the complexity of the human experience, including illness, suffering, pain, and dying. The aim of this project is to demonstrate how generating well-rounded, humanistic students in graduate health science programs can lead to more observant, empathetic clinicians in the future.

Keywords: PT education, health humanities, study abroad, graduate studies

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Price Blair, Dr. Lori Mize

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM

Being Observant: How Studying Michelangelo Can Improve PT Practice

Schewel 208

The field of physical therapy is swiftly transitioning from a formulaic biomedical model to a patient-centered biopsychosocial model, requiring clinicians to view their patients as a whole instead of as a sum of their parts. Integration of this concept into graduate health science education is variable across professions and amongst the same professional programs. Lynchburg College’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is pioneering an experiential learning course for graduate-level PT programs. “The Art of Anatomical Dissection: From Ancient Rome to the Renaissance” will transport students to the land of Da Vinci and Michelangelo, to study how the innovations of these men and others shaped the way we live today. From anatomical discoveries to breakthroughs in art mastery, the human body became a source of inspiration in all fields. Students will assess anatomical accuracy of some of the most famous art pieces in the world and reflect on the historic and cultural significance of that anatomy with regards to PT practice. Our presentation will focus on the impact this course is having on the students enrolled and how they will be able to use the experience to enrich their learning in the PT curriculum. Studies from MD programs currently employing this approach have exhibited students with a better ability to appreciate the complexity of the human experience, including illness, suffering, pain, and dying. The aim of this project is to demonstrate how generating well-rounded, humanistic students in graduate health science programs can lead to more observant, empathetic clinicians in the future.

Keywords: PT education, health humanities, study abroad, graduate studies