Presenter Information

Taylor NeiserFollow

Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:15 PM

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of focus tool use on time to complete concentration tasks, in both distracted and nondistracted environments. College-aged subjects (n=12, 75% female) completed two visits, one in each environment. Order of task and focus tool use was randomized across each visit. The tasks included Korner’d, Pegboard, and a computer-based reaction time test. Focus tools included a balloon squeeze, fidget cube, and lower-body theraband use. Time to completion was assessed for each task and was compared between the different tools and environments. A 2x3x4 within-subjects ANOVA was performed to compare mean time to completion between the different trials. There was no significant main effects for environment (F(1,11)=0.83, p>0.05) or tool (F(3,9)=2.41, p>0.05). There was an expected significant main effect for task (F(2,10)=193.93, p0.05) for environment, tool and task. Results suggest tools did not have any significant effect on task performance. Focus tool use may have benefit for select individuals however best practice for their use remains undetermined.

Faculty Mentor

Jill Lucas

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Apr 4th, 2:15 PM

The effects of upper and lower extremity focus tools on concentration to complete tasks

Schewel 208

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of focus tool use on time to complete concentration tasks, in both distracted and nondistracted environments. College-aged subjects (n=12, 75% female) completed two visits, one in each environment. Order of task and focus tool use was randomized across each visit. The tasks included Korner’d, Pegboard, and a computer-based reaction time test. Focus tools included a balloon squeeze, fidget cube, and lower-body theraband use. Time to completion was assessed for each task and was compared between the different tools and environments. A 2x3x4 within-subjects ANOVA was performed to compare mean time to completion between the different trials. There was no significant main effects for environment (F(1,11)=0.83, p>0.05) or tool (F(3,9)=2.41, p>0.05). There was an expected significant main effect for task (F(2,10)=193.93, p0.05) for environment, tool and task. Results suggest tools did not have any significant effect on task performance. Focus tool use may have benefit for select individuals however best practice for their use remains undetermined.