Presenter Information

Hannah KnechelFollow

Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 4:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Research has shown that the race of experimenters can affect perceptions that participants have, but political affiliation has not been studied. It has been found that the higher someone’s denial of white privilege is, the less likely they are to advocate or support moves towards racial equality. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of symbols of political affiliation and race on a perceptions of white privilege and anti-black discrimination. Participants were undergraduate students, age 18 or older. To manipulate the variables, experimenters were either black or white females who wore either a Black Lives Matter shirt, a Make America Great Again shirt, or a plain black shirt. Participants were asked to fill out a demographic questionnaire, a white privilege scale, a belief in other-focused discrimination scale, and an attitudes toward gender roles scale. In order to control for social desirability bias, participants were not told the entire nature of the study, rather that it was on attitudes toward social issues. Results were scored on a six point likert-scale. They will be analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis in order to determine if there was a significant difference between the six conditions.

Faculty Mentor

Virginia Cylke, Pepper Hanna, Nancy Cowden

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Apr 4th, 4:30 PM

Effects on exposure of symbols of Political Affiliation and Race on perceptions of white privilege and Anti-Black Discrimination

Schewel 232

Research has shown that the race of experimenters can affect perceptions that participants have, but political affiliation has not been studied. It has been found that the higher someone’s denial of white privilege is, the less likely they are to advocate or support moves towards racial equality. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of symbols of political affiliation and race on a perceptions of white privilege and anti-black discrimination. Participants were undergraduate students, age 18 or older. To manipulate the variables, experimenters were either black or white females who wore either a Black Lives Matter shirt, a Make America Great Again shirt, or a plain black shirt. Participants were asked to fill out a demographic questionnaire, a white privilege scale, a belief in other-focused discrimination scale, and an attitudes toward gender roles scale. In order to control for social desirability bias, participants were not told the entire nature of the study, rather that it was on attitudes toward social issues. Results were scored on a six point likert-scale. They will be analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis in order to determine if there was a significant difference between the six conditions.