Presenter Information

Sydney GreenFollow

Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 11:00 AM

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Context: Understanding the relationship between quality of life metrics and concussion baseline measures is important for clinical interpretation of baseline measures.

Objective: To determine the relationship between quality of life subscales and cognitive function in collegiate athletes.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting: Computer lab.

Participants: A total of 71 females and 86 males who participated in soccer (n=72) and lacrosse (n=83) volunteered for this study.

Interventions: PROMIS-29 subset scores served as the independent variables.

Main Outcome Measures: Concussion Vital Signs (CVS) composite scores (Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Executive Function, and Reaction Time) served as the dependent variables. We used multiple linear regression to determine if there was a relationship between quality of life and cognitive function.

Results: Quality of life influences cognitive function in the following categories: verbal memory, visual memory, and reaction time. We found a significant regression equation for Verbal Memory (F3,153=3.34, P= 0.02, R=0.06), Visual Memory (F2,154=3.82,, P=0.02, R=0.05, and Reaction Time (F7,147=2.13,, P=0.04, R=0.09) We did not find a significant equation for Executive Function (F1,156=1.69, P=0.52, R=0.05).

Conclusion: Reduced quality of life has negative effects on baseline concussion test scores thus supporting the utility of quality of life metrics at baseline.

Key Words: concussion, baseline scores, PROMIS-29

Word Count: 200

Faculty Mentor

Tom Bowman , Debbie Bradney

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM

The Relationship Between Cognitive Function and Quality of Life in Collegiate Athletes

Schewel 208

Context: Understanding the relationship between quality of life metrics and concussion baseline measures is important for clinical interpretation of baseline measures.

Objective: To determine the relationship between quality of life subscales and cognitive function in collegiate athletes.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting: Computer lab.

Participants: A total of 71 females and 86 males who participated in soccer (n=72) and lacrosse (n=83) volunteered for this study.

Interventions: PROMIS-29 subset scores served as the independent variables.

Main Outcome Measures: Concussion Vital Signs (CVS) composite scores (Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Executive Function, and Reaction Time) served as the dependent variables. We used multiple linear regression to determine if there was a relationship between quality of life and cognitive function.

Results: Quality of life influences cognitive function in the following categories: verbal memory, visual memory, and reaction time. We found a significant regression equation for Verbal Memory (F3,153=3.34, P= 0.02, R=0.06), Visual Memory (F2,154=3.82,, P=0.02, R=0.05, and Reaction Time (F7,147=2.13,, P=0.04, R=0.09) We did not find a significant equation for Executive Function (F1,156=1.69, P=0.52, R=0.05).

Conclusion: Reduced quality of life has negative effects on baseline concussion test scores thus supporting the utility of quality of life metrics at baseline.

Key Words: concussion, baseline scores, PROMIS-29

Word Count: 200