Presenter Information

Brandy FrazierFollow

Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 10:15 AM

Department

Biology

Abstract

Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is a pathogenic bacterium which causes the disease tularemia. F. tularensis is thought to be able to enter and multiply inside of liver cells because it interacts with toll-like receptors (TLRs). Examining the signaling pathway downstream of the TLRs will allow for better understanding of how this disease works and possible treatment strategies. In this study I propose to examine how molecular inhibitors affect signaling downstream of TLRs in HepG2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from E. coli. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is a cellular molecule in signaling cascades that directs cellular response mechanisms. MAPK can be activated by LPS. The signaling pathway will be examined for the ability of UO126 to block the activation of MAPK. The ability of UO126 to block MAPK will be examined with SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a western blot. Phospho-MEK antibodies will be utilized during the western blot. It is predicted that kinase inhibitors, such as UO126, will cause a decrease in downstream signaling after mock-infection. A decrease in downstream signaling will potentially cause a decrease in cellular response to the infection.

Faculty Mentor

Allison Jablonski

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

Included in

Biology Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 10:15 AM

Analysis of Downstream Signaling of TLRs after U0126 Inhibition

Schewel 232

Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is a pathogenic bacterium which causes the disease tularemia. F. tularensis is thought to be able to enter and multiply inside of liver cells because it interacts with toll-like receptors (TLRs). Examining the signaling pathway downstream of the TLRs will allow for better understanding of how this disease works and possible treatment strategies. In this study I propose to examine how molecular inhibitors affect signaling downstream of TLRs in HepG2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from E. coli. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is a cellular molecule in signaling cascades that directs cellular response mechanisms. MAPK can be activated by LPS. The signaling pathway will be examined for the ability of UO126 to block the activation of MAPK. The ability of UO126 to block MAPK will be examined with SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a western blot. Phospho-MEK antibodies will be utilized during the western blot. It is predicted that kinase inhibitors, such as UO126, will cause a decrease in downstream signaling after mock-infection. A decrease in downstream signaling will potentially cause a decrease in cellular response to the infection.