Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 11:00 AM

Department

Biology

Abstract

The yellow perch, Perca flavescens, is commonly found in lakes, slow-moving rivers, reservoirs, and ponds throughout the northeastern part of North America, and plays an ecological role in aquatic community structure and freshwater ecosystem. P. flavescens is known to serve as an intermediate host for completing the life cycle of numerous aquatic parasites, including yellow grubbs, Clinostomum marginatum. Our preliminary data on the infestation rate of C. marginatum on P. flavescens, collected from two Minnesota lakes during 2013-2017, was 100% (N = 46). C. marginatum appeared to choose one of the three major body regions (i.e., gills, body muscles, fins) as the parasite enters and forms encystment within the fish. In testing the hypothesis that C. marginatum encystment leads to suboptimal output propulsive force production in P. flavescens, we examined how C. marginatum forms encystment in the axial muscles using haematoxylin and eosin staining technique. The histological results provide insights into the impacts of encystment on muscle function for force production during the burst escape behavior of the fish against piscivorous avian predators.

Faculty Mentor

Takashi Maie

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM

Mode of Attachment of Avian Parasite, Clinostomum marginatum, in Intermediate Fish Host (Perca flavescens) and Impact on Host Locomotor Performance

Schewel 232

The yellow perch, Perca flavescens, is commonly found in lakes, slow-moving rivers, reservoirs, and ponds throughout the northeastern part of North America, and plays an ecological role in aquatic community structure and freshwater ecosystem. P. flavescens is known to serve as an intermediate host for completing the life cycle of numerous aquatic parasites, including yellow grubbs, Clinostomum marginatum. Our preliminary data on the infestation rate of C. marginatum on P. flavescens, collected from two Minnesota lakes during 2013-2017, was 100% (N = 46). C. marginatum appeared to choose one of the three major body regions (i.e., gills, body muscles, fins) as the parasite enters and forms encystment within the fish. In testing the hypothesis that C. marginatum encystment leads to suboptimal output propulsive force production in P. flavescens, we examined how C. marginatum forms encystment in the axial muscles using haematoxylin and eosin staining technique. The histological results provide insights into the impacts of encystment on muscle function for force production during the burst escape behavior of the fish against piscivorous avian predators.