Poster or Presentation Title

Quantification of Methionine Oxidation in Cadaveric Wetting/Preservative Solutions

Student Author Information

Susan SpenceFollow

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

April 2019

Department

Chemistry

Abstract

Wet specimens used in biology classrooms and laboratories, including cadavers, can easily deteriorate into dried specimens if not handled properly. The continuous management of specimens with proper preparation and use of wetting solution is absolutely essential. Traditional specimen fixative for embalming contains potentially health-threatening toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde (formalin). In search of a formula that could rid the dissection room of such chemicals and protect the students from unnecessary exposure, we previously evaluated the effectiveness (the longevity of hydration and preservation) of the candidate formula with mixtures of alcohol and organic compounds. Proteins are among the main targets for oxidation in biological systems. Protein oxidation has damaging consequences on protein structure and function. Oxidation of biomolecules has been associated with aging. In this project, we were interested in protein oxidation in cadaveric samples. Among the naturally occurring amino acids found in proteins, Cysteine and Methionine are easily oxidized. Methionine forms methionine sulfoxide by addition of oxygen to its sulfur atom. In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of preservative solutions in minimizing methionine oxidation. The preservative solutions were mixtures of low molecular weight alcohols, and glycols.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Takashi Maie, Dr. Samrat Thapa

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Apr 10th, 12:00 PM

Quantification of Methionine Oxidation in Cadaveric Wetting/Preservative Solutions

Wet specimens used in biology classrooms and laboratories, including cadavers, can easily deteriorate into dried specimens if not handled properly. The continuous management of specimens with proper preparation and use of wetting solution is absolutely essential. Traditional specimen fixative for embalming contains potentially health-threatening toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde (formalin). In search of a formula that could rid the dissection room of such chemicals and protect the students from unnecessary exposure, we previously evaluated the effectiveness (the longevity of hydration and preservation) of the candidate formula with mixtures of alcohol and organic compounds. Proteins are among the main targets for oxidation in biological systems. Protein oxidation has damaging consequences on protein structure and function. Oxidation of biomolecules has been associated with aging. In this project, we were interested in protein oxidation in cadaveric samples. Among the naturally occurring amino acids found in proteins, Cysteine and Methionine are easily oxidized. Methionine forms methionine sulfoxide by addition of oxygen to its sulfur atom. In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of preservative solutions in minimizing methionine oxidation. The preservative solutions were mixtures of low molecular weight alcohols, and glycols.