Student Author Information

Jacob OlichneyFollow

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2019

Department

Biology

Abstract

Pseudomonas putida GB-1 is a model organism for the study of manganese oxidation in bacteria, however, the frequency of co-localization of multiple known and suspected manganese oxidizing proteins, as well as their occurrence between species, is unknown. Eight different genes isolated from known manganese oxidizing bacteria (MnxG, MopA, McoA, PputGB1_2552, PputGB1_2553, MoxA, MofA, and Bacillus MnxG) were tested individually using BioPython and BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) on multiple genomic databases. BLAST searches had an expect value cutoff of 1e-50, limiting gene homologs to those with high sequence similarity. The abundance of homologous genes across classes of proteobacteria point towards the lateral transfer of manganese oxidase genes. This data, alongside phylogenetic gene trees, will provide a better indication of how manganese oxidase genes have spread between bacteria, as well as the evolutionary origin of manganese oxidation.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kurdi

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Apr 10th, 10:15 AM

Co-Occurrence of Manganese Oxidase Genes Indicates Lateral Transfer Between Classes of Proteobacteria

Pseudomonas putida GB-1 is a model organism for the study of manganese oxidation in bacteria, however, the frequency of co-localization of multiple known and suspected manganese oxidizing proteins, as well as their occurrence between species, is unknown. Eight different genes isolated from known manganese oxidizing bacteria (MnxG, MopA, McoA, PputGB1_2552, PputGB1_2553, MoxA, MofA, and Bacillus MnxG) were tested individually using BioPython and BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) on multiple genomic databases. BLAST searches had an expect value cutoff of 1e-50, limiting gene homologs to those with high sequence similarity. The abundance of homologous genes across classes of proteobacteria point towards the lateral transfer of manganese oxidase genes. This data, alongside phylogenetic gene trees, will provide a better indication of how manganese oxidase genes have spread between bacteria, as well as the evolutionary origin of manganese oxidation.