Student Author Information

Dakota ShepherdFollow

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2019

Department

Biomedical Science

Abstract

The second most common cancer in men is prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is traditionally diagnosed by a digital rectal exam. Blood tests can also be used to test for PSA (prostate-specific antigen). These two methods can be used together but can sometimes provide both false negative and false positive results. A new method of testing for prostate cancer could prove to be beneficial. Previous studies have shown that active HERV sequences have been identified in some cancers, including prostate cancer. We hypothesize that the presence of active HERV in prostate cancer lines is significant. In this study, rabbit polyclonal antibodies and Western blotting were used to assay for the presence of HERV protein products after 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine was used to amplify transcripts of prostate cancer-specific genes. Positive results may suggest a new method to detect prostate cancer in patient samples.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Allison Jablonski

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Apr 10th, 2:00 PM

Exploration of Prostate Cancer Cells: The Significance of Active HERV

The second most common cancer in men is prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is traditionally diagnosed by a digital rectal exam. Blood tests can also be used to test for PSA (prostate-specific antigen). These two methods can be used together but can sometimes provide both false negative and false positive results. A new method of testing for prostate cancer could prove to be beneficial. Previous studies have shown that active HERV sequences have been identified in some cancers, including prostate cancer. We hypothesize that the presence of active HERV in prostate cancer lines is significant. In this study, rabbit polyclonal antibodies and Western blotting were used to assay for the presence of HERV protein products after 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine was used to amplify transcripts of prostate cancer-specific genes. Positive results may suggest a new method to detect prostate cancer in patient samples.