Poster or Presentation Title

Dirge: An Artistic Expression of Death

Student Author Information

Willow RaglandFollow

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2019

Department

Art

Abstract

Dirge: An Artistic Expression of Death

In the winter of 2019, I embarked on a collaborative adventure with the University of Lynchburg DPT program and my studio art practice. The focus of my thesis exhibition will explore the creation of artworks based on my experiences and study of human anatomy in our university's cadaver lab. This project reflects the timeless tradition of observational drawing and the creation of work from both living and inanimate. Post-mortem anatomy classes were once required at famous art schools such as the Florentine Academy of Art and the Parisian École des Beaux-Arts. Thanks to pioneers such as Leonardo di Vinci and Michelangelo, who demonstrated the value of the practice, both our understanding of the form and function of the body flourished. I hope to illustrate the impact this experience has had on both my artwork and my understanding of the human form.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Siobhan Byrns, Price Blair, Bev Rhoads, Richard Pumphrey

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Apr 10th, 10:00 AM

Dirge: An Artistic Expression of Death

Dirge: An Artistic Expression of Death

In the winter of 2019, I embarked on a collaborative adventure with the University of Lynchburg DPT program and my studio art practice. The focus of my thesis exhibition will explore the creation of artworks based on my experiences and study of human anatomy in our university's cadaver lab. This project reflects the timeless tradition of observational drawing and the creation of work from both living and inanimate. Post-mortem anatomy classes were once required at famous art schools such as the Florentine Academy of Art and the Parisian École des Beaux-Arts. Thanks to pioneers such as Leonardo di Vinci and Michelangelo, who demonstrated the value of the practice, both our understanding of the form and function of the body flourished. I hope to illustrate the impact this experience has had on both my artwork and my understanding of the human form.