Student Author Information

Jessica RiquelmeFollow

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2019

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Context: Lacrosse is a fast growing contact sport, minimal studies have examined head impacts in women’s lacrosse.

Objective: To compare head impact mechanisms and type of play in women’s lacrosse.

Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Setting: Collegiate lacrosse fields.

Participants: 29 women’s lacrosse players (age=20.39±0.39 years, height=162.13+6.50 cm, mass=60.99+4.82 kg) participated over years. Intervention: Participants wore xPatch sensors during games and practices.

Main Outcomes Measures: Peak linear (PLA; g) and rotational (PRA; deg/sec2) accelerations of head impacts.

Results: Stick to head impacts occurred most often (IR=483.87, CI95=397.30-570.45); whereas, head to head impacts were the least common (IR=20.16, CI95=2.49-37.83; IRR=24.00, CI95=9.81-58.71). A player was 53.50 (CI95 13.21-216.70) times more likely to sustain a head impact while playing defense (IR=431.45, CI95 349.70-513.20) compared to when her team had an additional player due to a penalty on the opposing team (IR=8.06, CI95=3.11-19.24). The main effect for mechanism was significant (multivariate F10,458=2.91, P2=.06). Follow-up ANOVAs showed mechanism significantly altered PLA (F230,230=3.13, P=.009, �2=.06) and PRA (F230,230=2.71, P=.021, �2=.06). Type of play also altered the combined dependent variables (F8,458=2.37, P=.02, �2=.04); however, type of play did not alter PLA (F230,230=2.40, P=.051, �2=.04) nor PRA (F230,230=2.04, P=.089, �2=.03).

Conclusions: Women’s lacrosse players are most likely to sustain a head impact from stick to head contact while playing defense. Stick to head contacts are illegal in women’s lacrosse but occurred often during our data collection.

Key Words: Women’s lacrosse; xPatch sensors; head impacts

Faculty Mentor(s)

Tom Bowman and Debbie Bradney

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Apr 10th, 3:45 PM

Comparison of Head Impact Mechanisms and Type of Play for Women’s Lacrosse Over 4 Years

Context: Lacrosse is a fast growing contact sport, minimal studies have examined head impacts in women’s lacrosse.

Objective: To compare head impact mechanisms and type of play in women’s lacrosse.

Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Setting: Collegiate lacrosse fields.

Participants: 29 women’s lacrosse players (age=20.39±0.39 years, height=162.13+6.50 cm, mass=60.99+4.82 kg) participated over years. Intervention: Participants wore xPatch sensors during games and practices.

Main Outcomes Measures: Peak linear (PLA; g) and rotational (PRA; deg/sec2) accelerations of head impacts.

Results: Stick to head impacts occurred most often (IR=483.87, CI95=397.30-570.45); whereas, head to head impacts were the least common (IR=20.16, CI95=2.49-37.83; IRR=24.00, CI95=9.81-58.71). A player was 53.50 (CI95 13.21-216.70) times more likely to sustain a head impact while playing defense (IR=431.45, CI95 349.70-513.20) compared to when her team had an additional player due to a penalty on the opposing team (IR=8.06, CI95=3.11-19.24). The main effect for mechanism was significant (multivariate F10,458=2.91, P2=.06). Follow-up ANOVAs showed mechanism significantly altered PLA (F230,230=3.13, P=.009, �2=.06) and PRA (F230,230=2.71, P=.021, �2=.06). Type of play also altered the combined dependent variables (F8,458=2.37, P=.02, �2=.04); however, type of play did not alter PLA (F230,230=2.40, P=.051, �2=.04) nor PRA (F230,230=2.04, P=.089, �2=.03).

Conclusions: Women’s lacrosse players are most likely to sustain a head impact from stick to head contact while playing defense. Stick to head contacts are illegal in women’s lacrosse but occurred often during our data collection.

Key Words: Women’s lacrosse; xPatch sensors; head impacts