Student Author Information

Sidney MichauxFollow

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2019

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

Wilson’s disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes copper to accumulate in the structures of the basal ganglia in the brain, affecting motor coordination and signaling to muscles. This can cause symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease, such as dystonia, dysarthria, drooling, muscular rigidity, and trouble starting and stopping movements. The purpose of this study is to understand the muscle activation pattern of muscles in the arm of an individual with neurological Wilson’s disease while performing basic motor skills before and after treatment, and to compare these patterns to a healthy control subject. Two participants (1 affected, 1 unaffected) performed 3 movements while connected to a device that measures surface electromyography (sEMG), which records amplitude and duration of muscle excitation for each movement. The affected individual performed one trial before treatment with Botox and one trial afterwards, which were compared to one trial performed by the unaffected individual. The results will help make comparisons between movement patterns of different diseases of the basal ganglia with unaffected individuals, provide insight on contraction of antagonistic muscles and their role in coordination, as well as show the effects of treatment with Botox on and individual with Wilson’s Disease.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jill Lucas, Takashi Maie, Sean Collins

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Apr 10th, 4:30 PM

A case-control study of muscular activity in an individual with neurological Wilson’s disease

Wilson’s disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes copper to accumulate in the structures of the basal ganglia in the brain, affecting motor coordination and signaling to muscles. This can cause symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease, such as dystonia, dysarthria, drooling, muscular rigidity, and trouble starting and stopping movements. The purpose of this study is to understand the muscle activation pattern of muscles in the arm of an individual with neurological Wilson’s disease while performing basic motor skills before and after treatment, and to compare these patterns to a healthy control subject. Two participants (1 affected, 1 unaffected) performed 3 movements while connected to a device that measures surface electromyography (sEMG), which records amplitude and duration of muscle excitation for each movement. The affected individual performed one trial before treatment with Botox and one trial afterwards, which were compared to one trial performed by the unaffected individual. The results will help make comparisons between movement patterns of different diseases of the basal ganglia with unaffected individuals, provide insight on contraction of antagonistic muscles and their role in coordination, as well as show the effects of treatment with Botox on and individual with Wilson’s Disease.