Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Nicotinic Effects on Memory Consolidation Post Contextual Fear Conditioning of Adult Danio Rerio

Student Author Information

Brianna Fann, University of LynchburgFollow

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 1:15 PM

Department

Biology

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated that many stimulants, including nicotine, enhance memory when administered to mammals immediately following learning. Fewer studies, however, have examined the effects of nicotine on memory formation in simple vertebrates, including fish. Moreover, nothing is known about nicotine’s effects on memory following contextual fear conditioning in non-mammalian vertebrates. The goal of this experiment was to determine the effects of nicotine on the consolidation of fear-related memory in zebrafish. It was hypothesized that nicotine, given immediately after conditioning (learning), would enhance memory consolidation. Zebrafish were randomly categorized into two groups: placebo and nicotine (100mg/L). Following this, individual fish were placed in a conditioning tank, where a Rigolpower supply administered three shocks (20 mA) in a distinct conditioning environment painted canary yellow. Immediately after three conditioning trials, individual fish were exposed to placebo or nicotine for 15 minutes. Conditioned fear responses were measured 24 and 48 hours in either the conditioned context or the novel context (painted white with blue textured floor). Fear was operationally-defined as the absence of movement for at least two consecutive seconds, except gill or ocular motions. Results indicated that conditioned fear responses of nicotine and placebo-exposed fish to the novel or conditioning context were not significantly different.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Keith Corodimas

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 8th, 12:00 PM Apr 8th, 1:15 PM

Nicotinic Effects on Memory Consolidation Post Contextual Fear Conditioning of Adult Danio Rerio

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Previous research has demonstrated that many stimulants, including nicotine, enhance memory when administered to mammals immediately following learning. Fewer studies, however, have examined the effects of nicotine on memory formation in simple vertebrates, including fish. Moreover, nothing is known about nicotine’s effects on memory following contextual fear conditioning in non-mammalian vertebrates. The goal of this experiment was to determine the effects of nicotine on the consolidation of fear-related memory in zebrafish. It was hypothesized that nicotine, given immediately after conditioning (learning), would enhance memory consolidation. Zebrafish were randomly categorized into two groups: placebo and nicotine (100mg/L). Following this, individual fish were placed in a conditioning tank, where a Rigolpower supply administered three shocks (20 mA) in a distinct conditioning environment painted canary yellow. Immediately after three conditioning trials, individual fish were exposed to placebo or nicotine for 15 minutes. Conditioned fear responses were measured 24 and 48 hours in either the conditioned context or the novel context (painted white with blue textured floor). Fear was operationally-defined as the absence of movement for at least two consecutive seconds, except gill or ocular motions. Results indicated that conditioned fear responses of nicotine and placebo-exposed fish to the novel or conditioning context were not significantly different.