Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Mangrove Reforestation and In-Water Sea Turtle Monitoring at the Osa Project of LAST in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 1:15 PM

Department

Biology

Abstract

The internship was completed in the summer of 2019 and revolved around entirely on biological sciences and field work — working on collecting data to better understand the turtle aggregations in the Golfo Dulce and planting mangrove plots to replenish the mangrove population and determine which parameters yield the best survival rates. Both work are parts of different levels of understanding and show two different parts of the scientific process. Latin American Sea Turtles (LAST) is working towards building an information database of turtle populations, which may lead to further experiments or observational studies of their patterns and then to effective conservational protection. The schedule was broken down into two types of work days - ocean days and mangrove days. Mangrove days involved planting plots, collecting and planting seeds in the nursery, collecting mud for seed planting, and remeasuring plots. Ocean days involved setting out turtle nets, assisting and leading data collection of caught turtles, tagging new turtles, and untangling the nets upon completion of the 6 hour day on one of 8 designated beaches for turtle-catching. In addition, some days involved cleaning the beach, leading a nature walk in a nearby plantation trail, taking care of any turtles present at our rescue center, and assisting in the maintenance of the local recycling center. I was also in charge of mangrove data input, so when we planted new plots or remeasured plots I recorded the data. While not a regular occurrence, we also involved ourselves with the local community through educating youth on our program. This internship enhanced leadership skills and fieldwork skills that have contributed towards my growing interest in conservation.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jennifer Styrsky

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Apr 8th, 12:00 PM Apr 8th, 1:15 PM

Mangrove Reforestation and In-Water Sea Turtle Monitoring at the Osa Project of LAST in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

The internship was completed in the summer of 2019 and revolved around entirely on biological sciences and field work — working on collecting data to better understand the turtle aggregations in the Golfo Dulce and planting mangrove plots to replenish the mangrove population and determine which parameters yield the best survival rates. Both work are parts of different levels of understanding and show two different parts of the scientific process. Latin American Sea Turtles (LAST) is working towards building an information database of turtle populations, which may lead to further experiments or observational studies of their patterns and then to effective conservational protection. The schedule was broken down into two types of work days - ocean days and mangrove days. Mangrove days involved planting plots, collecting and planting seeds in the nursery, collecting mud for seed planting, and remeasuring plots. Ocean days involved setting out turtle nets, assisting and leading data collection of caught turtles, tagging new turtles, and untangling the nets upon completion of the 6 hour day on one of 8 designated beaches for turtle-catching. In addition, some days involved cleaning the beach, leading a nature walk in a nearby plantation trail, taking care of any turtles present at our rescue center, and assisting in the maintenance of the local recycling center. I was also in charge of mangrove data input, so when we planted new plots or remeasured plots I recorded the data. While not a regular occurrence, we also involved ourselves with the local community through educating youth on our program. This internship enhanced leadership skills and fieldwork skills that have contributed towards my growing interest in conservation.