Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Alternative Therapies for Mind, Body and Soul Throughout India

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 1:15 PM

Department

Public Health

Abstract

For thousands of years complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was the most commonly used practice of medicine (WHO, 2017). Over time, Western or conventional medicine advanced and transformed society to non-CAM methods for disease management and treatment. Prescriptions, other drugs and surgeries provide for that option resulting in many people thinking that the use of conventional medicine is the only treatment for certain illnesses or diseases and needed to achieve a healthy lifestyle (Abdelmalek, Alkhawaja, & Darwish, 2016). More recently, CAM methods have been increasingly used and recommended for managing and treating diseases. Studies suggest that the CAM methods of yoga and meditation appear to regulate stress response systems and in turn help reduce stress, anxiety and depression, among other health ailments (Harvard Health Publishing, 2018). To explore the benefits of yoga and meditation and its connection to public health, a review of literature was conducted using keywords of yoga, health, meditation, mindfulness, India and complementary and alternative medicine. In addition, multiple qualitative methods including interviews, photography, observation and photovoice were implemented in Vrindavan and Rishikesh, India, otherwise known as the Yoga Capital of the World. Results supported previous literature on the many individual health benefits including improved physical and mental health and the potential to reduce crime and violence. Public health recommendations include implementing more yoga and meditation programs in schools, workplaces and community settings. Doing so could lead to decreased risk for disease, lower healthcare costs, and improved overall health and well-being for individuals and communities.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jennifer Hall

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Apr 8th, 12:00 PM Apr 8th, 1:15 PM

Alternative Therapies for Mind, Body and Soul Throughout India

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

For thousands of years complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was the most commonly used practice of medicine (WHO, 2017). Over time, Western or conventional medicine advanced and transformed society to non-CAM methods for disease management and treatment. Prescriptions, other drugs and surgeries provide for that option resulting in many people thinking that the use of conventional medicine is the only treatment for certain illnesses or diseases and needed to achieve a healthy lifestyle (Abdelmalek, Alkhawaja, & Darwish, 2016). More recently, CAM methods have been increasingly used and recommended for managing and treating diseases. Studies suggest that the CAM methods of yoga and meditation appear to regulate stress response systems and in turn help reduce stress, anxiety and depression, among other health ailments (Harvard Health Publishing, 2018). To explore the benefits of yoga and meditation and its connection to public health, a review of literature was conducted using keywords of yoga, health, meditation, mindfulness, India and complementary and alternative medicine. In addition, multiple qualitative methods including interviews, photography, observation and photovoice were implemented in Vrindavan and Rishikesh, India, otherwise known as the Yoga Capital of the World. Results supported previous literature on the many individual health benefits including improved physical and mental health and the potential to reduce crime and violence. Public health recommendations include implementing more yoga and meditation programs in schools, workplaces and community settings. Doing so could lead to decreased risk for disease, lower healthcare costs, and improved overall health and well-being for individuals and communities.