Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Blood Flow Restriction and Power Production in Overhead Throwing Athletes

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 1:15 PM

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if blood flow restriction training leads to improvements in baseball-specific power movements. Improvements in such movements could indirectly lead to greater athletic success and the use of blood flow restriction training. A total of 17 participants were randomly divided into a sham (n=9; age=19.89±0.78 years, height=181.75±5.55 cm, weight=84.30±8.25 kg) and experimental (n=8; age=20.00±0.93 years, height=181.93±5.25 cm, weight=88.15±10.37 kg) group during a 6-week training program. The independent variable was BFR pressure applied during training (experimental and sham) and time (pre-test and post-test). Dependent variables were baseball-specific movements found in the Nike SPARQ Baseball Test (Maximum Back Squat, Maximum Bench Press, Vertical Jump, 20-yard shuttle run, 30-yard dash, 6 lb medicine ball toss, maximum throwing velocity). Results failed to show a significant interaction between group and time for all dependent variables (P>.05). However, there was a significant main effect for time when analyzing 30-yard dash, 20-yard shuttle, and back squat (P

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Tom Bowman
Dr. Sean Collins
Dr. Ed Smith

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Apr 8th, 12:00 PM Apr 8th, 1:15 PM

Blood Flow Restriction and Power Production in Overhead Throwing Athletes

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if blood flow restriction training leads to improvements in baseball-specific power movements. Improvements in such movements could indirectly lead to greater athletic success and the use of blood flow restriction training. A total of 17 participants were randomly divided into a sham (n=9; age=19.89±0.78 years, height=181.75±5.55 cm, weight=84.30±8.25 kg) and experimental (n=8; age=20.00±0.93 years, height=181.93±5.25 cm, weight=88.15±10.37 kg) group during a 6-week training program. The independent variable was BFR pressure applied during training (experimental and sham) and time (pre-test and post-test). Dependent variables were baseball-specific movements found in the Nike SPARQ Baseball Test (Maximum Back Squat, Maximum Bench Press, Vertical Jump, 20-yard shuttle run, 30-yard dash, 6 lb medicine ball toss, maximum throwing velocity). Results failed to show a significant interaction between group and time for all dependent variables (P>.05). However, there was a significant main effect for time when analyzing 30-yard dash, 20-yard shuttle, and back squat (P