Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

The Effect of Different Recovery Positions on Immediate Post-Exercise Recovery

Location

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 11:15 AM

End Date

8-4-2020 11:30 AM

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

Background: An upright standing, hands on head posture is commonly advised by training staff in exercise settings. However, previous research suggests that the use of more non-traditional positions, such as bent over with hands on knees, may be more beneficial for respiratory muscles and recovery. If we have a better understanding of recovery mechanisms, we could better prepare athletes to manage fatigue and optimize performance in competition. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of different body positions on recovery from high-intensity exercise. Methods: On two separate occasions University of Lynchburg athletes aged 18-30 years old completed a graded treadmill interval sprint protocol followed by 3 minutes in an assigned recovery position. A total of 10 sprints were performed at 10 miles per hour and at 10% grade, interspersed with 20 second rest intervals. Positions were either standing tall with hands on head or bent over with hands on knees and were assigned in randomized order. During the exercise and recovery sections of testing, subjects’ respiratory gas exchange (RER) and minute ventilation (VE) were continuously measured. Findings from this study may help inform the recovery practices promoted by athletic trainers, coaches, and other exercise professionals.

Key Words: Recovery, position, exercise, fatigue

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jill Lucas
Dr. Tom Bowman
Dr. Sean Collins
Dr. Ed Smith

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Apr 8th, 11:15 AM Apr 8th, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Different Recovery Positions on Immediate Post-Exercise Recovery

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Background: An upright standing, hands on head posture is commonly advised by training staff in exercise settings. However, previous research suggests that the use of more non-traditional positions, such as bent over with hands on knees, may be more beneficial for respiratory muscles and recovery. If we have a better understanding of recovery mechanisms, we could better prepare athletes to manage fatigue and optimize performance in competition. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of different body positions on recovery from high-intensity exercise. Methods: On two separate occasions University of Lynchburg athletes aged 18-30 years old completed a graded treadmill interval sprint protocol followed by 3 minutes in an assigned recovery position. A total of 10 sprints were performed at 10 miles per hour and at 10% grade, interspersed with 20 second rest intervals. Positions were either standing tall with hands on head or bent over with hands on knees and were assigned in randomized order. During the exercise and recovery sections of testing, subjects’ respiratory gas exchange (RER) and minute ventilation (VE) were continuously measured. Findings from this study may help inform the recovery practices promoted by athletic trainers, coaches, and other exercise professionals.

Key Words: Recovery, position, exercise, fatigue