Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Does Peripheral Lower Body Blood Flow Restriction Training Effect Anaerobic Threshold or Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation in Sedentary or Recreationally Active Adults?

Student Author Information

Kaitlyn King, University of LynchburgFollow

Location

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 1:45 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 2:00 PM

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

Introduction: Blood flow restriction (BFR) training has been shown to improve anaerobic and aerobic adaptations simultaneously. Few studies have examined the effects of aerobic BFR training on the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) or anaerobic threshold.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of bilateral lower limb continuous BFR during recumbent cycling in sedentary/recreationally active adults over 7 weeks of training on OBLA and anaerobic capacity.

Methods: Eight sedentary/recreationally active subjects (4 males, 4 females) were randomized into a BFR training group (n=5) or a non-BFR control training group (n=3). A graded cycle ergometer exercise test, starting at 100W with 25W increase every 2 min, was performed pre-treatment, mid-treatment, and post-treatment. A capillary blood draw (0.7 µL) was taken from the fingertip at the end of each 2-min work stage. The training was performed once a day, 2 days/week, for 7 weeks at least 24 hours apart. Each training session consisted of a 5-min warm-up on a recumbent cycle ergometer, 20 min cycling at 40% of heart rate reserve wearing the BFR cuffs inflated bilaterally (60% of arterial occlusion pressure (AOP), BFR-training; 5% of AOP, non-BFR), and a 5 min. cool-down.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Sean Collins
Dr. Jeffrey Herrick
Dr. Jill Lucas

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Apr 8th, 1:45 PM Apr 8th, 2:00 PM

Does Peripheral Lower Body Blood Flow Restriction Training Effect Anaerobic Threshold or Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation in Sedentary or Recreationally Active Adults?

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Introduction: Blood flow restriction (BFR) training has been shown to improve anaerobic and aerobic adaptations simultaneously. Few studies have examined the effects of aerobic BFR training on the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) or anaerobic threshold.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of bilateral lower limb continuous BFR during recumbent cycling in sedentary/recreationally active adults over 7 weeks of training on OBLA and anaerobic capacity.

Methods: Eight sedentary/recreationally active subjects (4 males, 4 females) were randomized into a BFR training group (n=5) or a non-BFR control training group (n=3). A graded cycle ergometer exercise test, starting at 100W with 25W increase every 2 min, was performed pre-treatment, mid-treatment, and post-treatment. A capillary blood draw (0.7 µL) was taken from the fingertip at the end of each 2-min work stage. The training was performed once a day, 2 days/week, for 7 weeks at least 24 hours apart. Each training session consisted of a 5-min warm-up on a recumbent cycle ergometer, 20 min cycling at 40% of heart rate reserve wearing the BFR cuffs inflated bilaterally (60% of arterial occlusion pressure (AOP), BFR-training; 5% of AOP, non-BFR), and a 5 min. cool-down.