Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Atrial Fibrillation

Location

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 2:45 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 3:00 PM

Department

Physician Assistant

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of heart arrhythmia1. It is characterized by the upper chambers of the heart (atria) beating irregularly and rapidly instead of beating efficiently to allow blood to adequately fill into the ventricles2. This arrhythmia may be paroxysmal (termination of AF in < 7 days), persistent (termination of AF after more than 7 days), or permanent (patients with persistent AF on rhythm control therapy)3. Atrial fibrillation has adverse effects associated with decreased cardiac output and increased risk of thrombus formation from the atrial appendages that can ultimately cause a stroke1,3. “Atrial fibrillation is the leading cause of cardiac stroke”3. Risk factors associated with AF are increasing age, hypertension, history of coronary artery disease, obesity, increased alcohol intake, diabetes, COPD, and sleep apnea1,2,4. Symptoms for each patient can vary from asymptomatic to chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, and fatigue3. Despite the stage of AF, several treatment strategies have been implemented to improve quality of life and decrease risk of thrombus formation. Treatment approaches include oral anticoagulation, rate control therapy, rhythm control therapy, direct current cardioversion (DCCV), transcatheter ablation, and other surgical approaches.

Key Words: atrial fibrillation, arrhythmia, stroke, anticoagulation, rate control, and rhythm control

References:

  1. Kumar K, Zimetbaum P, Saperia G. Overview of atrial fibrillation. UpToDate. https://www-uptodate-com.ezproxy.lynchburg.edu/contents/overview-of-atrial-fibrillation?search=atrial&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1#H1044452932. Published February 11, 2020. Accessed February 17, 2020.

  2. What is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)? American Heart Association. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/atrial-fibrillation/what-is-atrial-fibrillation-afib-or-af. Published July 31, 2016. Accessed February 17, 2020.

  3. Nesheiwat Z. Atrial fibrillation. StatPearls. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526072/. Published December 8, 2019. Accessed February 17, 2020.

  4. Michaud GF, Stevenson WG. Atrial Fibrillation. In: Jameson J, Fauci AS, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, Loscalzo J. eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 20e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; . http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=2129§ionid=192028757. Accessed February 17, 2020.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jenna Rolfs

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Apr 8th, 2:45 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

Atrial Fibrillation

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of heart arrhythmia1. It is characterized by the upper chambers of the heart (atria) beating irregularly and rapidly instead of beating efficiently to allow blood to adequately fill into the ventricles2. This arrhythmia may be paroxysmal (termination of AF in < 7 days), persistent (termination of AF after more than 7 days), or permanent (patients with persistent AF on rhythm control therapy)3. Atrial fibrillation has adverse effects associated with decreased cardiac output and increased risk of thrombus formation from the atrial appendages that can ultimately cause a stroke1,3. “Atrial fibrillation is the leading cause of cardiac stroke”3. Risk factors associated with AF are increasing age, hypertension, history of coronary artery disease, obesity, increased alcohol intake, diabetes, COPD, and sleep apnea1,2,4. Symptoms for each patient can vary from asymptomatic to chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, and fatigue3. Despite the stage of AF, several treatment strategies have been implemented to improve quality of life and decrease risk of thrombus formation. Treatment approaches include oral anticoagulation, rate control therapy, rhythm control therapy, direct current cardioversion (DCCV), transcatheter ablation, and other surgical approaches.

Key Words: atrial fibrillation, arrhythmia, stroke, anticoagulation, rate control, and rhythm control

References:

  1. Kumar K, Zimetbaum P, Saperia G. Overview of atrial fibrillation. UpToDate. https://www-uptodate-com.ezproxy.lynchburg.edu/contents/overview-of-atrial-fibrillation?search=atrial&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1#H1044452932. Published February 11, 2020. Accessed February 17, 2020.

  2. What is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)? American Heart Association. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/atrial-fibrillation/what-is-atrial-fibrillation-afib-or-af. Published July 31, 2016. Accessed February 17, 2020.

  3. Nesheiwat Z. Atrial fibrillation. StatPearls. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526072/. Published December 8, 2019. Accessed February 17, 2020.

  4. Michaud GF, Stevenson WG. Atrial Fibrillation. In: Jameson J, Fauci AS, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, Loscalzo J. eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 20e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; . http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=2129§ionid=192028757. Accessed February 17, 2020.