Virtual Presentations

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Location

Virtual Recording

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 1:15 PM

Department

Criminology

Abstract

The controversy regarding gender and race has resulted in the tendency by many scholars to focus on one or a few crime categories, such as theft or homicide, in order to make their findings more specific. According to Sommers & Baskin (1992), gender may cause misinterpretation without the inclusion of race when researching violent crime because both are inherently linked to an individual’s identity. It was determined that seasonal crime, specifically property-related crimes, is associated with routine activities theory (Hipp et. al., 2004). In this study, data from the City of Lynchburg Office of Corrections in Virginia was sorted based upon 34 crime categories, and binomial logistic regression models were examined using gender and race as predictor variables. The results of this study suggest support for that hypothesis that there are significant gender and race disparities to both violent and property crime categories. These results illustrate the merge between general strain theory and routine activities theory in the commission of a crime. However, temperature-aggression was not supported. Future research is detrimentally important to shed light on community-police relations and how to reduce the prevalence of specific gender- and race-based disparities among particular crime categories.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Michael Klein
Dr. Lindsay Parks

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 8th, 12:00 PM Apr 8th, 1:15 PM

A Seasonal Crime?: A Quantitative Examination of the Relationship Between Criminal Charges in the City of Lynchburg and Seasons of the Year with Reference to Gender and Race

Virtual Recording

The controversy regarding gender and race has resulted in the tendency by many scholars to focus on one or a few crime categories, such as theft or homicide, in order to make their findings more specific. According to Sommers & Baskin (1992), gender may cause misinterpretation without the inclusion of race when researching violent crime because both are inherently linked to an individual’s identity. It was determined that seasonal crime, specifically property-related crimes, is associated with routine activities theory (Hipp et. al., 2004). In this study, data from the City of Lynchburg Office of Corrections in Virginia was sorted based upon 34 crime categories, and binomial logistic regression models were examined using gender and race as predictor variables. The results of this study suggest support for that hypothesis that there are significant gender and race disparities to both violent and property crime categories. These results illustrate the merge between general strain theory and routine activities theory in the commission of a crime. However, temperature-aggression was not supported. Future research is detrimentally important to shed light on community-police relations and how to reduce the prevalence of specific gender- and race-based disparities among particular crime categories.