Poster or Presentation Title

Groundwater Well Monitoring in Urban Wetlands

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 1:15 PM

Department

Environmental Science

Abstract

It is the intention of this study to focus on the groundwater (GW) hydrology of the Blackwater Creek Wetlands. More specifically, this project is designed to identify, monitor, and analyze the water table within the study area’s palustrine forested and scrub-shrub wetlands, and adjacent floodplains. There are several products that this project will yield: 1) this data can be used to simulate the pre-dam removal GW hydrological conditions and be used to predict changes in GW characteristics post-dam removal, 2) the data collected at these sites will help aid AECOM’s stream and wetland design, 3) the data will be valuable in determining the success of the restoration, 4) and a GW hydrograph can be developed and maintained to assess GW trends over time and be utilized for future research.

Since July 2020, depth to water table samples have been collected manually using a water level meter. This method of sampling is useful for developing macro or meso scale hydrographs and will provide beneficial data for other applications. However, there are several limitations to this method, such as the inability to monitor at night, the inability to monitor during high flow or hazardous flood events and inhibits samples of base-flow conditions due to the availability of the technician as well as uncontrollable environmental conditions. Recently, a submersible pressure transducer has been deployed in an attempt to alleviate some issues associated with manually measuring wells, thus increasing the frequency, efficiency, and safety of data collection, and permitting the creation of a micro scale GW hydrograph.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Laura Henry-Stone

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Apr 7th, 12:00 PM Apr 7th, 1:15 PM

Groundwater Well Monitoring in Urban Wetlands

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

It is the intention of this study to focus on the groundwater (GW) hydrology of the Blackwater Creek Wetlands. More specifically, this project is designed to identify, monitor, and analyze the water table within the study area’s palustrine forested and scrub-shrub wetlands, and adjacent floodplains. There are several products that this project will yield: 1) this data can be used to simulate the pre-dam removal GW hydrological conditions and be used to predict changes in GW characteristics post-dam removal, 2) the data collected at these sites will help aid AECOM’s stream and wetland design, 3) the data will be valuable in determining the success of the restoration, 4) and a GW hydrograph can be developed and maintained to assess GW trends over time and be utilized for future research.

Since July 2020, depth to water table samples have been collected manually using a water level meter. This method of sampling is useful for developing macro or meso scale hydrographs and will provide beneficial data for other applications. However, there are several limitations to this method, such as the inability to monitor at night, the inability to monitor during high flow or hazardous flood events and inhibits samples of base-flow conditions due to the availability of the technician as well as uncontrollable environmental conditions. Recently, a submersible pressure transducer has been deployed in an attempt to alleviate some issues associated with manually measuring wells, thus increasing the frequency, efficiency, and safety of data collection, and permitting the creation of a micro scale GW hydrograph.